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Four Little Butches: Tomboys in Hollywood Film Kristen Hatch In the 1976 comedy, The Bad News Bears, 11-year-old Amanda Whurlitzer (Ta-tum O’Neal) undergoes a remarkable transformation. When we are introduced to her, Amanda wears a long skirt, peasant blouse, and floppy, oversized hat. She is the epitome of precocious femininity. By the end of the film, she has trans- formed into a baseball-playing tomboy whose powerhouse pitch helps save a team of underachieving boys from ignominious defeat. Such a transformation, from feminine girl to tomboy, is virtually

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York Press, 2000), 177–191. Allen, Robert C., ‘Home Alone Together: Hollywood and the “Family Film”’, in Melvyn Stokes and Richard Maltby, eds, Identifying Hollywood’s Audiences: Cultural Identity and the Movies (London: British Film Institute, 1999), 109–131. Allison, Anne, ‘Cuteness as Japan’s Millennial Product’, in Joseph Tobin, ed., Pikachu’s Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon (London: Duke University Press, 2004), 34–49. Anderson, Christopher, ‘Disneyland’, in Horace Newcomb, ed., Television: The Criti- cal View (Oxford: Oxford University Press

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Monica, CA: Interscope. Menash, P. (2010). Spartacus: War of the damned. Hollywood, CA: Raimi Productions. Nelson, J. (2017, September 6). How Madonna is raising Malawi: Inside her tireless work help- ing children and fighting poverty in Africa. People. Retrieved from http://people.com/ music/madonna-raising-malawi-charity-helping-orphans-fight-poverty-africa/ Our Last Night. (2015, July 26). Our last night – dark horse (warped tour 2015 @ Tinley Park, Chicago IL). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1J9DmkXki6g OurLastNightBand. (2016, May 24). Our last

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is rudely torn from the wholeness of the visual plus acoustic impression and presented alone. Moreover, there is no more ef fective way of destroying the only means of training the listener to concentrate on the audible.8 In the United States, such outcries were already commonplace before the formation of the networks, and they were raised not only by high-hatting observers of mass culture but also by the medium’s advocates and tributaries. In March 1926, for instance, a broadcast critic whose column purported to represent “The Listener’s Point of View

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Murder Case. New York: St Martin’s, 1987. Becknell, Howard. “Radio Drama, 1935–1945, Television Drama, 1945–1950: A Study of Trends in the Use of Dialogue.” MA thesis, Indiana University, 1951. Beichman, Arnold. Herman Wouk: The Novelist as Social Historian. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, 1984. Berg, Gertrude. The Rise of the Goldbergs. New York: Barse, 1931. Biggers, Earl Derr. Seven Keys to Baldpate. 1913. Holicong, PA: Wildside, 2003. Billips, Connie, and Arthur Pierce. Lux Presents Hollywood. Jef ferson, NC: McFarland, 1995. Bishop, John Peale. “The Muse at the

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, and Sheree of Hollywood Exes go with their friends on a trip to Hawaii. Nicole also hosts her friend Andrea’s wedding at her large, elaborate home. Taj (SWV: Reunited) and Nene (The Real House- wives of Atlanta) are shown entertaining in their luxurious homes. Kim (L.A. Hair) is shown working in her own hair salon and working with several celeb- rity clients. Some of the women on Married to Medicine boast about their wealth. Quad and Mariah make reference to the several furs they own. Toya brags about the new (large) home that she and her family found

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Introduction This book began with the desire to develop the notion of ambivalence and the politics of Chinese identity in transnational cinema, theoretically chal- lenging ideological constructions of racial and ethnic identity that are histori- cally produced and defined within a homogeneous nation-state mechanism in a postcolonial and transnational context . In the past two decades, the explosion of transnational Chinese cinema in the global film market has raised many critical is- sues . As current transnational feature films such as Curse of the Golden

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them or not. Even Hollywood actress Jennifer Lawrence, who is not known to keep her head down, participated in this campaign and tweeted the photo of the Neo-Nazis and said, “These are the hate faces. Look closely at them and let them know if you know them. You can not run away on the Internet! “Soon these efforts worked out. It turned out that the racist genocide was a stu- dent of Nevada University called Peter Cvjetanonic, was shouting angrily with a torch in his hands at the photo, which was sent to everyone. The racist teen became a global phe- nomenon in

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simultaneously commodifying and sexualizing them at an increasingly younger age. Much of the reaction to Bratz dolls focuses on their sexuality and generates a moral panic. Still their “brattitude” coincides with the representation of ethnic girls, including Latinas, as physical and pushy in other mainstream media (Valdivia, “Living”). Whereas assertiveness can be coded as positive, its slippage into “brattitude” places it within the racialized realm of be- havioral problems. These hybrid girls are tamed when they cross into Hollywood film; they are made more assimilable

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of Transnational Encounters,” 2005), Aihwa Ong (Flexible Citizenship, 1999), and others raised the question of Chinese ethnic identity by problematizing and deconstructing the notion of Chinese iden- tity and its representation, as it is usually constructed as cultural essentialism— “sinocentrism .” Chineseness is no longer a notion that can only be considered under a nation-state mechanism; instead the discourse must be situated within specific cultural and political contexts . As discussed previously, postcolonial theory primarily emphasizes the process of