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. Let me explain. Being out of the closet means you are out—or open—about your sexuality. To be out is to be outside the law (as in outlaws) and being out means also to be taken out, erased, as in an out-take from films. The edited-out portions of film are of interest to Ellis Hanson who states The outtake raises the possibility that to be taken out—to be taken out to the movies, to be taken out of the movies—is often to be taken in (perhaps knowingly), to be seduced for better or for worse by the spectacle of one’s own disappearance—which is to say, one’s own

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maintain, reinforce, and per- petuate existing power relations? How can language be used to resist, redefine and possibly reverse these relations? This approach engages in the process of consciousness-raising, that is, the process of actively helping teachers becoming aware of their White privilege, and, importantly, what to do about it. foreword xvii These are the kinds of questions that undergird Godley and Reaser’s work with teachers. This work, they acknowledge, is not easy, particularly in terms of addressing race and racism. They noted that many of the

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-referential in the brief absence of any major competi- tors. This period witnessed an early flowering of feature film produc- tion in Australia when compared to the United Kingdom and the 1 Author Unknown, ‘Australian Films: A National Need’, The Courier-Mail, Monday 5 March 1934, p. 10. 2 An interview with bell hooks, quoted in Kelvin Shawn Sealey, ed., Film Politics and Education, p. 148. 3 Roslyn Russell and Philip Chubb, One Destiny! The Federation Story – How Australia Became a Nation, Melbourne: Penguin, 1998, p. 4. 4 Dianne Collins, Hollywood Down Under

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Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) form of propaganda—it is not a Hollywood song and dance film like those popular at the time. America’s Army depicts realistic training and combat scenarios and has serious intent. America’s Army shares another facet with Why We Fight—it has serious intent. Frank Capra was consciously crafting a propaganda mes- sage. The message he crafted was tailored to respond to the powerful Nazi propaganda vehicle, Triumph of the Will. Admirers of America’s Army were quick to compare it favorably to Capra’s propaganda films and to advocate the

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. New York: Routledge. Aronowitz, S. (2001). The Knowledge Factory: Dismantling the Corporate University and Creating True Higher Learning. Boston: Beacon. Aronowitz, S. (2003). How Class Works: Power and Social Movement. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Aronowitz, S., and DiFazio, W. (1994). The Jobless Future: Sci-Tech and the Dogma of Work. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Aronowitz, S., and Giroux, H. (1991). Post-Modern Education: Politics, Culture, and Social Criticism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Bamburg, J. (1994). Raising

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presented through a quali- tative lens of a historically White college setting, where Whiteness is dominant even in Black studies courses. From this study, they developed a “typology of White student resistance in the Black studies Classroom” that is supported by several outcomes that can be expected when Black studies is framed within the context of critical White studies. In chapter 8, “‘Burn hollywood Burn’: The Political economy of degradation Through the Com- modification of representation,” B. l. lozenski explores how Black degradation is perpetuated in con

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- alism for Latina/o students: Raising voices above the silencing in our schools.” Multicultural Education, 14 (2), 16–23. Carnegie Corporation (2001). “Whole-district school reform.” Carnegie Re- porter, 1 (2), 1–2. Carnoy, M., & H. Levin. (1985). Schooling and work in the democratic state. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Carspecken, P.F. (1996). Critical ethnography in educational research: A theo- retical and practical guide. New York: Routledge. Collatos, A. (2004). “The post-high school trajectories of Futures students: Assessing access.” Paper

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case of people with disabilities, …narratives of illness have the power to transform both the author and the audi- ence: They serve to both inform the public about illness phenomenon and clarify and affirm the experience for the person who experiences it. In the field of psy- chiatric research, consumer narratives are increasingly recognized as an invalu- able resource for understanding the perspectives of people who have experienced mental illness firsthand or in their immediate families and for raising conscious- ness about appropriate forms of treatment

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, they want to raise families and contribute to society, and they want to enjoy the fruits of their hard work. Admittedly, most of them don’t want to be overwhelmed by world events or engaging in the arduous work necessary to acquire the skill sets that will enable them to read the word and the world with a critical eye toward the suffering masses of humanity, the ranks of which are expanding exponentially with each passing decade. Everyday life—raising a family, holding down a job, keeping oneself and one’s loved ones healthy—is a daunting enough chal- lenge

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considered a positive for the city to improve education,24 and likely the potential for redevelopment.25,26 A growing body of research suggests the presence of charter schools in poor minority urban areas has the potential to attract middle- class millennials to move to the city, as well as raise property values in areas where charter schools are situated27,28 (Hankins, 2007; Horowitz, Keil, & Spector, 2009). Researchers have been increasing attention among academics linking urban rede- velopment, gentrification, and the increasing presence of charter schools in