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(1971) and Death of a Transvestite Hooker (1974). In all of this, Wood’s films lend themselves to analysis in terms of an understanding of the aesthetics of trash. That forty years after Wood’s heyday a young Hollywood wunderkind with five successive hit films under his belt would come along to enshrine the man as an exemplar of creative energy, addresses the paradigm at the heart of the study of trash – the notion of what use we make or what value we find in the detritus of cultural pro- duction. Tim Burton’s Ed Wood is a monument to creative individuality at

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the post-Celtic Tiger era, with its recession-induced austerity measures and restored patterns of unemployment and mass migration. In particular, the chapter argues that Moone Boy activates a complex ‘reflective nostalgia’ which, by narratively returning the viewer to the late 1980s and early 1990s, evokes a time loaded with the promise of greater democratic citizenship and raised national stature, yet elides the hedonistic excesses and subsequent loss of economic sovereignty associated with the Celtic Tiger and its aftermath. Introduction In this article, I

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that complemented and heightened the generation- molding effects of the movie theater as public space. Moreover, it was American films, specializing in what one US foreign affairs expert bemoaned as the fanciful romances and thrillers of the “people of the Orient and Middle East,” that issued an implicit challenge to the mores of respectable Turkish families, raising concerns about moral development, sexual exploits, and changing definitions of beauty and femininity.42 The fancifulness of Hollywood cinema may have drawn little attention or censure from the

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-Rogen-Paul Rudd-Jason Segal comi-verse), this situation serves as a major signal about early 21st-century Hollywood and masculinity, particularly for these male actors who don’t star in action films or feature as traditional romantic leads. These guys are real. 38 the other guy They’re on Twitter and Facebook. They do the late night circuit, particularly The Daily Show and The Colbert Report, and not just during press junkets for their latest movies. They show up just to hang out. In this sense, they’re sell- ing an elaborate and carefully constructed image, complete with

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OLIETE-ALDEA Identifying Otherness in Transnational Film: Slumdog Millionaire The 2009 edition of the Oscar Academy Awards seemed to witness the encounter of Hollywood and Bollywood thanks to the success of Slumdog Millionaire (Boyle 2008), a cinematographic production that ultimately epitomizes global identities and transnational (mis)identify- cations. Written and directed by a British screenwriter and director, the film is based on an acclaimed novel by an Indian diplomat who made use of a world-famous TV show as the main storyline of her narrative.1 The

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spawned a sequel Wayne’s World 2 3 Peter William Evans and Celestino Deleyto, ‘Introduction: Surviving Love’, in Terms of Endearment: Hollywood Romantic Comedy of the 1980s and 1990s (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998), 1–19 (p. 1). 4 Frank Krutnik, ‘Love Lies: Romantic Fabrication in Contemporary Romantic Comedy’, in Terms of Endearment: Hollywood Romantic Comedy of the 1980s and 1990s, 15–26 (p. 20). 5 Jeanne Dubino, ‘Wayne’s World: Postmodern or Nostalgic?’, Popular Culture Review, 6.2 (1995), 145–53 (145). Love and Other Subtitles 127 the following

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crippled figure of the main protagonist that seem prominent in the emanation of distortion and hope- lessness the play presents us with. The nominal hero of the play is not only physically disabled but also quite ugly as his own aunts describe him: “Not be- ing cruel to Billy but you’d see nicer eyes on a goat” (McDonagh 1998: 8). Nevertheless, he dreams of becoming a film star and the realization of his dream seems close enough when some Americans from Hollywood come to nearby Inishmore to make a film about the life on the islands (The Man of Aran, 88 Dagmara

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half the movies playing in Europe were produced by Hollywood), and American music (notably through Willis Conover’s radio program Music U.S.A., with tens of millions of listeners), all sponsored by the U. S. government, postwar planners sought to win the hearts and minds of Europeans and to create a bulwark against Soviet Communism. Nor should this diminish the impact of forms of American mass culture as they traveled under their own commercial auspices, free from government backing, to reach European audiences. But it is important to understand that mass cul- ture

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associated with Hollywood went on to be reconsidered, and the American blockbusters are as popular in Italy now as they were in the 1950s.13 In Italy, dubbed American films were and are the norm for film audiences, however home- grown films were also very popular, as audience identification was such that only the high emotions that were performed on the screen could guaran- tee an enjoyable evening out. It was to be the performative nature of their memories of the films that still holds a large degree of importance to some Italian émigrés in Britain, some sixty years

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gather to be guys with each other, unhassled by the demands of parents, girlfriends, jobs, kids, and the other nuisances of adult life. In this topsy-turvy, Peter-Pan mindset, young men shirk the responsibilities of adulthood and remain fixated on the trappings of boyhood, while the boys they still are struggle heroically to prove that they are real men despite all the evidence to the contrary.3 Kimmel’s emphasis on ‘shirking’ and ‘proving’ is key; these dudes are caught between the dual impulses of avoiding while corroborating their masculinity. And Hollywood