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potential to pave the way for social transformation toward social justice. But what is social justice? What people mean by the term social justice may vary depending on the social psychology of individuals. Moreover, the ideological apparatus of a soci- ety can, to a great extent, determine the parameters that define what social introduction 3 justice means to the majority of members of that society. It is given that peo- ple are strongly affected by their assessments of what is just or fair in their dealings with others. Given the atrocities committed by human

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.” —Edward Gross, University of Washington, Dept. of Sociology (Emeritus) “Asimow and Mader convincingly argue that popular representations of law are crucial to how people understand and perceive the legal system. This is an important, social constructionist insight that is not stressed often enough in law schools. The book is very well organized and shines in its emphasis on cinematic techniques, using films as illuminating case studies through which to more fully understand the American criminal and civil justice systems. The authors’ cultural legal approach is

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community’s constructed accounts of itself and competes with the narratives that are more often created by others. This perspective insists that there is no account, story or description that is anything more than an incomplete interpretation, and that therefore one cannot automatically claim authority over another. Although this approach is acutely scepti- cal about the rhetoric constructed around certain social practices, it also stimulates a pragmatic adoption of certain discourses to explain theatre to non-theatre audiences. This is the ‘visitor in the

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utilizing a “situation-specific arts-based” sce- nario and a transgressive aesthetic approach, alter- ing and disrupting socially accepted narratives about the purpose of museums as social institutions through “the experience of viewing/physically ne- gotiating/performing” within the juxtaposed and overlapping contexts of “interactive, immersive art installations” (Beer & Grauer, 2011, p. 4). Ulti- mately, this work of art and research enacted a re- scripting of lived and local contexts, one that promotes “reflection on the challenges and impacts of social, cultural, and

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in Concannon’s pocket. Galvin’s closing argument ignores the facts of the case and urges the jury to do justice. The jury returns with a stunning verdict for the plain- tiff. We leave the theater with the satisfied feeling that justice was done, but the film paints a dark picture of the character and ethics of the two lawyers. Few would be inspired to take up the legal profession after seeing this film. This book is designed to be used as the reader for a course in law and popu- lar culture. The course studies movies like To Kill a Mockingbird (Chapter 3), The

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convenor of the International Scholars of the Western Network. matthew carter is a senior lecturer in film, television and cultural studies at Manchester Metropolitan University. He is the author of Myth of the Western: New Perspectives on Hollywood’s Frontier Narrative (2014) and co-editor (with Andrew Patrick Nelson) of ReFocus: The Films of Delmer Daves (2016). He has contributed chapters to the edited vol- umes Contemporary Westerns: Film and Television Since 1990 (ed. Andrew Patrick Nelson, 2013) and The Post-2000 Western: Contexts, Transnationality

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-Director of Undergraduate Studies in Music and Assistant Professor of Music, Music Education at Boston University. A regular presenter of research papers and research-to-practice workshops, Karin has served as an orchestra clinician and adjudicator throughout the United States and abroad. She has served in a variety of local, national, and international leadership positions. Dr. Hendricks conducts research in social psychology and social justice, with a particular focus on student motivation and musical engagement. She has published dozens of papers in peer

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, on the one hand, and the institutional disingenuousness of the Irish host society that would seek to reject his or her claims without, at the same time, disavowing its traditionally congenial and hospitable self-image as an open and welcoming place. The play’s underlying sense of conflict is predicated, in other words, upon this contestation of narratives as a vehicle of a wider social and political struggle that pits the individual figure of the asylum seeker against the preconceptions and hostile attitudes of the Irish host society. The play’s underlying

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the reason that he begins to have a range of hallucinations, including the presence of a malicious, human-sized talking rabbit who encourages Donnie towards mad, anti-social and destructive behaviours (and who also functions as the harbinger of some kind of apocalypse). But Donnie Darko can also be interpreted as a film that engages with a postmodern perspective in which a ‘schizo’ view of the contemporary world is a sometimes painful, yet necessary, survival strategy. The narrative of Donnie Darko is indeterminate, and while it seems that Donnie dies at

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of history which simulta- neously serves to stimulate new fictions for subverted subjectivities, and point towards the fragility of dominant discourse in narrative versions of tra- ditional history. In so doing, he confronts the power structures which use history to crystallize social and political hegemonies by disrupting the or- M CHAPTER ONE 20 ganization that traditional histories imply, substituting them with ‘fictional’ representations of the profusion of power through divergent political and biographical historical analogies. Michel Foucault