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Interests). 云南社会科学 (Social Sciences in Yunnan). 6: 76–80. Jackson, Bernard S. 1991. Narrative Models in Legal Proof. In Papke, David R. (ed.) Narrative and the Legal Discourse: A Reader in Storytelling and the Law. Liverpool: Deborah Charles Publica- tions, 158–178. Jacquemet, Marco 1996. Credibility in Court: Communicative Prac- tices in the Camorra Trials. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Jensen, Marie 1995. Linguistic Evidence Accepted in the Case of a Non-native Speaker of English. In Eades, Diana (ed.) Language in Evidence. Sydney: University of New

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). However, the distinction between the two different modes is not clear-cut. For in- stance, we can place the narrations offered in parties’ examinations a- mong the naturally occurring ones because they are based on the nar- ration of personal experiences involving the parties, even though that 7 For a deeper discussion of this phase of the proceeding see Anesa (2010, 2012). 8 For a discussion of narrative as a form of social action see Bruner (2002) and Atkinson/Delamont (2006). Multiple Narratives in Arbitration

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: Narratives in Reports about Climate Change 287 (12) “Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable. We are faced now with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now.…Over the bleached bones and jumbled residues of numerous civilizations are written the pathetic words: Too late.” Delivered in a sermon on social justice four decades ago, Martin Luther King’s words retain a powerful resonance. At the start of the 21st Century, we too are confronted with the ‘fierce urgency’ of a crisis

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structures, and actions can transform structures. Social change takes place through dialectical interconnections between existing structures and the strategies of social agents and agencies to sustain or transform structures. Strategies have a discursive moment – part of what distinguishes one strategy from others is its particular configuration of discourses and narratives, narratives which connect the present and the past with predictive or prescriptive imaginaries for the future (Fairclough 2006, Jessop 2002). Discourses and narratives construe social phenomena

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her discus- sion is the translator’s ‘black box’, dealing with socially situated textu- ality. No surprise, therefore, that she should highlight the contribution by Albrecht Neubert: “It is hard to do justice to the depth, elegance and complexity of this chapter, which distillates more than 30 years of experience […] Translatio does not so much invest languages as situate texts” (1999: 320). Neubert’s chapter, entitled “Postulates for a theory of Trans- latio”, starts with a definition of translation and interpreting as “[a] unique languaging context” (Neubert

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justice in language tests Debates in language testing in the past two decades have challenged two major dimensions: on the one hand, the social and critical dimensions of tests, refer- ring to the uses, impact and washback of language tests (Messick, 1981, 1996; McNamara 2006); on the other, the language dimension, referring to updated and current definitions of language within a social context of testing. In this paper we acknowledge the progress that has been made in both domains over the past decade before arguing for a newly engaged approach to critical

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boost their clean identity and reputation as ethically correct in the promotional material issued by two Finnish companies operating in environmentally sensitive sectors of industry: processed food and heat- ing systems. Her investigation shows how both companies have created their ethical identity through narratives of, evidently, fictional worlds, but worlds which can evoke pleasant and positive homely im- ages of ‘good old days’ when genuine products were the common rule. Ethical identity through the manifestation of social responsibility and its linguistic

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2002), I have followed Richards’ observation that “the researcher must somehow establish a working compromise between a desire to draw general conclusions and the responsibility to do justice to the uniqueness of the particular” (Richards 2006: 2). Consequently, this investigation did not aspire to draw some generalizable considerations, to establish a definite characterization of courtroom language, or to provide a key to the unveiling of all the complex dynamics that are at play in the course of trial proceedings. However, it has identified some coordi

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Narrative from Qual- itative Research. Narrative Inquiry, 16. 164-172. 214 Atkinson, Robert 2007. The Life Story Interview as a Bridge in Narra- tive Inquiry. In Clandinin, D. Jean (ed.) Handbook of Narrative Inquiry, Mapping a Methodology. London: Sage. 224-246. Attardo, Salvatore 2003. Introduction: The Pragmatics of Humor. Journal of Pragmatics, 35. 1287-1294. Babbie, Earl R. 2010. The Practice of Social Research. Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing. Bailey, Lee F. / Rothblatt, Henry B. 1971. Successful Techniques for Criminal Trials. Rochester, N.Y.: Lawyers Co

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, behaviour and a sense of social solidarity underpinning European integration. In his insightful work, Calhoun (2003) looks into the mechanisms that create solidarity and consensus, focusing on the role played by discourse. He maintains that public discourse is pivotal to the creation of Europe’s identity: “European discourse not only addresses European identity; it forms it partly by how it represents Europe and also by how it engages the rest of the world” (Calhoun 2003: 270) [emphasis added]. Our study strongly embraces Calhoun’s contention that it is through