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, social, linguistic or psychological. 2 Jay Prosser, ‘Introduction’ in American Fiction of the 1990s: Ref lections of history and culture, ed. by Jay Prosser (New York: Routledge, 2008), pp. 1–14. Prosser deals with transnational borders, race cathexes, historical narratives, sex images and postmodern technologies. While postmodern technologies are not, strictly speaking, of direct relevance to Retrato en sepia, it is noticeable that many of the other general charac- teristics outlined by Prosser are applicable to this text. 3 Juan E. De Castro, The Spaces of Latin

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protagonist of Marginais. However, Evel Rocha’s marginals hold on to a sense of social justice that would emanate from the judgements of Sergio Pitbull, salvaged from common sense, and rest upon his sense of masculinity. Reading Evel Rocha’s narrative imposes on us a vain attempt to answer Gayatri Spivak’s question in her seminal article ‘Can the subaltern speak?’ (Spivak, 1988). The Indian sociologist’s pessimistic view of the impossibility of access to discourse by subalterns is borne out in this narrative in which characters are trapped by the inexorability of

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necessarily mutually exclusive nor complementary. The first is structured around a line of thought and action that focuses on the search for and affirmation of American cultural identities in the postcolonial period. The second, meanwhile, puts its weight behind a line of questioning aimed at the totalitarian and homogenizing character of national states, responsible for the silencing and/or erasure of the voices and identities of minorities historically relegated to a subaltern place in the social bodies of their nations. The first line may, as Jobim (2015) puts it

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economic exigencies of his family, only to decide that the personal cost of assimilation into a hostile urban environment is too high. Similarly, Ernesto finds himself unable to reconcile his desire for social justice with the socioeconomic realities of the Andes, yet he opts to continue championing his values. Lucho, however, abandons O •JO URNEY S OF F ORM AT IO N • 90 the sierras in a gesture of self-preservation from what he regards as a degrading familial and social environment, while the Argüello girl, shunned by her family, chooses to take a stand

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193 Conclusion This study showed that the Scerbanenco’s Lamberti novels ac- curately and critically articulate and explore the implications of emerging forms of criminality, closely linked to Italy’s post- war transformation and, in particular, to its economic miracle. Scerbanenco’s engagement with socio-economic, political and ethical issues, such as urbanization, capitalism, violence, justice, crime and gender identity, suggests that his works are intellectu- ally and socially committed, although they have never been per- ceived in connection with the post

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, or I fuochi del Basento by Raffaele Nigro deconstruct the patriotic myth of the Risorgimento as an all-national movement. In these and other nov- els, it is shown as a spurious master narrative that eclipsed all further alterna- tives for a political and social reorganisation of the fragmented country. Alt- hough nation is here the formal framework of reference, these texts put forth a far more integrative and democratic picture of the collective past by inscribing into it the trajectories of those groups of population that had been excluded from participation

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to a reinscription of the terrorist self – now former terrorist self – within less threatening and more socially and politically acceptable norms, more ‘one of us’ than ‘one of them’. Although by no means a homogeneous set of writings, such perpetra- tor narratives nevertheless have a number of common traits: first, former terrorists prove very loath to use highly charged terms like terrorism and terrorist, preferring to speak of ‘lotta armata’ (armed strug- gle) so as to give their actions a political dignity the negative descriptor ‘terrorism’ might not

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problematize and explore literary expres- sion and authority as themes in their own right, they do so largely within the framework of a broader social and cultural critique. Indeed, for several of our writers, the very nature of the relationship between textual referent and real-world counterpart, as well as the way that relationship is staged in the text, provides an important focus for analysis.17 Céline’s Casse-pipe perhaps most obviously draws attention to this concern: by ‘internally’ destabilizing relations between the various components of narrative and shaking

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transformed and translated into the else- where in Angola, Mozambique, Guinea-Bissau and Cape Verde; there is also the question of how the language and the culture of the ‘translated’, the metropolitan centre, is itself transformed by the return of other his- tories and narratives within the language and literature it considers to be its ‘own’. The centrality of Portuguese – now ‘uprooted’ – in the multiple narratives of an African postcoloniality neither proposes the mirror nor the monstrous mutation of its European ‘origin’. It is something more, unex- pected and

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esportilla" -in effect, delivery boys-since this 10 On the question of languages in this nove/a, see A. W. Hayes, "Narrative 'Errors' in Rinconete y Cortadi/lo," BHS 58.1 (1981 ): 13-20. 11 See H. Sieber's introductory comments, I, 26-27. 12 Sevilla figures significantly in several of the Novelas ejemplares-La espanola inglesa, El ce/oso extreme1lo, El coloquio de los perros, etc.-and as I shall suggest in a later chapter, the moral implications of Cervantes's particularly rendered Spanish geography are quite important (see Chapter 8, "Identity and Social Order: La