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Digital Fandom 2.0

New Media Studies

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Paul Booth

In this completely revised and updated version of Digital Fandom, Paul Booth extends his analysis of fandom in the digital environment. With new chapters that focus on the economics of crowdfunding, the playfulness of Tumblr, and the hybridity of the fan experience, alongside revised chapters that explore blogs, wikis, and social networking sites, Digital Fandom 2.0 continues to develop the «philosophy of playfulness» of the contemporary fan. Booth’s analysis reveals the many facets of the digital fan experience, including hybrid fandom, demediation, and the digi-gratis economy. With a foreword from noted fan scholar Matt Hills, Booth's new Digital Fandom 2.0 shows the power of the fan in the digital age.
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part 2 digital fandom 2.0 · 6 · demediation and hybrid fandom He realized that he’d thrown the dice. That he’d moved to the first square in a dangerous game … but he felt like playing. —Pérez-Reverte, The Club Dumas (pp. 62–3) All throughout history Magi have wandered the globe, spreading their teachings of pow- erful magic. The magic they wield comes from the enchanted Runes they have collected over the ages. In order to learn this magic, a Magi must complete a Rune Quest for the specific power that they seek. Only those that complete all Rune Quests can be

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part i historical digital fandom · 1 · fandom in the digital environment [Texts] are mirrors in the image of those who wrote them. They reflect their concerns, questions, desires, life, death. … They’re living beings: you have to know how to feed them, protect them … —Pérez-Reverte, The Club Dumas (p. 60) [I]n literature there are never any clear boundaries. Everything is dependent on every- thing else, and one thing is superimposed on top of another. It all ends up as a complicated intertextual game … —Pérez-Reverte, The Club Dumas (p. 95) In traditional

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foreword The “Imaginary Opponents” of Digital Fandom (and Fan Studies) Matt Hills “It was you who filled in the blanks on your own. … The real culprit is your exces- sive intertextual reading and linking of literary references. … And that’s where the danger lies: an excess of references may have caused you to create the wrong opponent, or an imaginary opponent.” —Pérez-Reverte, The Club Dumas, p. 335 In this second edition of Digital Fandom (just as in its predecessor) Paul Booth uses The Club Dumas as a fertile source of chapter epigraphs. When I was

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table of contents Foreword by Matt Hills xi Acknowledgments xxi Introduction to the Second Edition 1 Introduction to the First Edition 7 Part I: Historical Digital Fandom 17 Chapter 1: Fandom in the Digital Environment 19 Re-Writing Media Studies 21 Digital Fandom 25 Web Commons 30 Digi-Gratis Economy 34 Digital Fandom, the Web Commons, and the Digi-Gratis Economy in Practice 41 Chapter 2: Digital Fandom between Text and Intertext 53 The Blog: A Critical Understanding 56 Text, Intertext, Intra-Text 59 The New Carnival 63 Self-Reflexivity 65

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In this completely revised and updated version of Digital Fandom, Paul Booth extends his analysis of fandom in the digital environment. With new chapters that focus on the economics of crowdfunding, the playfulness of Tumblr, and the hybridity of the fan experience, alongside revised chapters that explore blogs, wikis, and social networking sites, Digital Fandom 2.0 continues to develop the “philosophy of playfulness” of the contemporary fan. Booth’s analysis reveals the many facets of the digi- tal fan experience, including hybrid fandom, demediation

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introduction to the second edition Time moves differently in academic publishing and in digital culture. New technologies are designed and created, flourish, and wither, so quickly that publishing about them is guaranteed to be out-of-date; academic publishing is notoriously time-consuming and prone to obsolesce. Writing academically about new technology is therefore a seemingly futile gesture, as one can never hope to be caught up. I originally wrote Digital Fandom in 2008–2009; it was based on my dis- sertation from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

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Adolescents’ Online Literacies ABOUT THE BOOK This revised edition of Adolescents’ Online Literacies: Connecting Classrooms, Digital Media, and Popular Culture features a variety of digital tools for humanizing pedagogy. For example, the book examines numerous artistic representations of young people’s self-selected graphic novels and fan fiction as part of an in-class multi-genre unit on fandom. This edition makes concrete connections between what the research portrays and what teachers, school librarians, and school media specialists know to be the case

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acknowledgments I am indebted to so many people, both for this second edition and for shaping my thoughts on fandom and fan studies over the past decade. I’m particularly grateful to the folks at Peter Lang—Mary Savigar in particular—who sug- gested I undertake this revision in the first place. It has been a real learning experience to go back to this, my first major work, and see how much has changed (and how much really hasn’t). I’m also grateful to Steve Jones, the editor of the Digital Formations series, for his help in guiding the first edition into

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–3, archontic properties 86, 89, 94–6, 105 authorship, collaborative 13, 26, 57, 60, 84 90, 223 B belonging 124, 235 blog 11, 54–5, 56–9 blog, image 221, 234 blog, text 56 branched narratives 134–136 C Campbell hero quest 171 canon 27, 70, 97, 135, 229 capital, social 28, 100, 195, 197 capitalism xv, 28, 185 carnivalesque 11, 55, 63–5, 67–8, 74 centrifugal force 63, 70 centripetal force 63–4, 70 278 digital fandom 2.0 chrono-logic 85, 91 cloudmakers 160, 162 collaborative interpretation 85 collaborative potential 205 collecting 199 collective intelligence 23, 84, 89, 96