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Educational Psychology Reader

The Art and Science of How People Learn - Revised Edition

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Edited By Greg S. Goodman

The revised edition of Educational Psychology Reader: The Art and Science of How People Learn presents an exciting amalgam of educational psychology’s research-based reflections framed in twenty-first century critical educational psychology. As a discipline, educational psychology is reinventing itself from its early and almost exclusive identification with psychometrics and taxonomy-styled classifications to a dynamic and multicultural collage of conversations concerning language acquisition, socially mediated learning, diverse learning modalities, motivation, the affective domain, brain-based learning, the role of ecology in increasing achievement, and many other complementary dimensions of how people learn. Many polymaths of the discipline are included in this volume, providing daunting evidence of the range and intellectual rigor of educational psychology at this historical juncture. Featuring a collection of renowned international authors, this text will appeal to scholars across the globe. The Educational Psychology Reader is an ideal choice as either the primary or supplemental text for both undergraduate and graduate level educational psychology courses.
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25. Researching Children’s Place and Space

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CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE

Researching Children’s Place and Space

Julia Ellis



In an autobiographical reflection on how her rural childhood currently shapes her experience of academic work, Jipson (2000) begins with the following recounting.

It is the third time since July that I have caught myself picking berries, making pie, while my academic projects sit waiting at the computer.…My mother and grandmother taught me to harvest every ripe berry, slice and can each carrot and beet.…Learning to do the “real work,” the sort that is done with your hands not your head, was an essential part of my growing up.…It was a way of life that defined time and value as well as survival. But now, in this other-world of academe, I wonder how to frame my identity as a worker. (p. 37)

In the remainder of the article, Jipson’s analysis stands as an insightful and articulate testimony to the way in which we always carry as part of ourselves the places where we have lived. Making this point on the basis of an extensive literature review, Chawla (1992) has argued that children’s place attachments are important both for what they contribute to the quality of their lives and for the enduring effects they leave after childhood is over. Our experiences are circumscribed by our places and our personalities and perspectives are developed from the experiences we have in the places available to us...

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