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Christianity and the Secular Border Patrol

The Loss of Judeo-Christian Knowledge

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Edited By Barry Kanpol and Mary Poplin

Christianity and the Secular Border Patrol: The Loss of Judeo-Christian Knowledge centrally looks at how secular universities have dominated academic knowledge on the one hand and have also been a part of bias against Christian academics on the other. Authors generally ask for borders of understanding and collegial dialogue to bridge gaps of knowledge that exist because of this bias. Theoretical analysis and narratives from the field describe how overcoming extreme theoretical positions may allow for productive knowledge construction and a more harmonious relationship within the culture wars of our times, especially in higher education.

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Christianity and the Secular Border Patrol: The Loss of Judeo-Christian Knowledge centrally looks at how secular universities have dominated academic knowledge on the one hand and have also been a part of bias against Christian academics on the other. Authors generally ask for borders of understanding and collegial dialogue to bridge gaps of knowledge that exist because of this bias. Theoretical analysis and narratives from the field describe how overcoming extreme theoretical positions may allow for productive knowledge construction and a more harmonious relationship within the culture wars of our times, especially in higher education.

“For most Americans secularism is the air we breathe: it is invisible and sustaining and terribly limiting, all at the same time. This most powerful of modern ideologies derives its power from the claim to be above or below or to the side of ideology. That claim does not survive a reading of the essays in this book.”

—Stanley Fish, Distinguished University Professor of Humanities and Law at Florida International University, prolific public intellectual, and featured author in the New York Times, The Huffington Post, as well as academic journals in law, religion, and the humanities

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