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Women Lead

Career Perspectives from Workplace Leaders

Edited By Tracey Wilen-Daugenti, Courtney L. Vien and Caroline Molina-Ray

Women are taking the lead in today’s workforce. They hold half of America’s jobs, 51% of supervisory and managerial positions, and nearly 60% of all college degrees. A woman starts a business in the U.S. every 60 seconds. Without women, the U.S. economy would be 25% smaller than it is today.
Women Lead is an in-depth examination of women’s role in today’s workplace. Drawing on interviews with nearly 200 women leaders, and survey responses from more than 3000 male and female managers, the book explains 21st-century career trends and provides practical advice to help women excel in the new world of work. Readers will discover facts, figures, and real-life stories about leadership, education, and career planning, and learn how women are using negotiation, networking, and other collaborative practices to lead their organizations into the future.
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5. Education and Skills: A Woman’s Toolkit for the Future

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Education and Skills

A Woman’s Toolkit for the Future

All over the world, millions of women are making one of the best decisions they can make to ensure their future earning potential and job satisfaction: They’re getting educated. Since the 1990s, US women have outpaced men in earning bachelor’s degrees; recently, they’ve surpassed men in obtaining master’s, professional, and doctoral degrees as well. In a job market characterized by complexity, technological sophistication, and volatility,1 these women are increasing their chances of being hired and deemed valuable, promotable employees. Given that most of them will have multiple careers in their lifetimes and will need to continually update their skills to be successful, they’re making their futures more secure: They’re discovering how to learn and think critically, core skills that are the building blocks of a lifetime of learning.

The Big Man on Campus . . . Is Probably a Woman

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