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Women Lead

Career Perspectives from Workplace Leaders

Tracey Wilen-Daugenti, Courtney L. Vien and Caroline Molina-Ray

Women are taking the lead in today’s workforce. They hold half of America’s jobs, 51% of supervisory and managerial positions, and nearly 60% of all college degrees. A woman starts a business in the U.S. every 60 seconds. Without women, the U.S. economy would be 25% smaller than it is today.
Women Lead is an in-depth examination of women’s role in today’s workplace. Drawing on interviews with nearly 200 women leaders, and survey responses from more than 3000 male and female managers, the book explains 21st-century career trends and provides practical advice to help women excel in the new world of work. Readers will discover facts, figures, and real-life stories about leadership, education, and career planning, and learn how women are using negotiation, networking, and other collaborative practices to lead their organizations into the future.
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8. The Labyrinth of Life: How Women Are Reshaping Work, Family Life, and Retirement

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The Labyrinth of Life

How Women Are Reshaping Work, Family Life, and Retirement

After 21 years of marriage, attorney Mary Hart was blindsided by a divorce. She was raising three children, had no income, and had recently moved to a new city. “It would have been easy to fall apart,” she remembers, but she didn’t. Instead, she started her own law firm. She now employs eight other women, some of whom are also single mothers, and invests in real estate. “I never would have done any of that had I not gotten divorced,” she says. “What I thought was going to kill me ended up being one of the best things that ever happened to me.”

Ann Michael was working for a small pharmaceutical logistics company when she discovered she had breast cancer. “I remember sitting on the couch, not feeling very well, and thinking, ‘I’m tired of working for other people because there’s so much else I want to do,’” she says. She went to her boss with a plan: She’d offload some of her tasks and do the others as a consultant. “I wound up making the same amount of money working 20 hours a week, and using the other 20 hours to build a business,” Michael says. She now is president of publishing and media consulting firm Delta Think.

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