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STEM21

Equity in Teaching and Learning to Meet Global Challenges of Standards, Engagement and Transformation

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Edited By Joy Barnes-Johnson and Janelle M. Johnson

STEM21: Equity in Teaching and Learning to Meet Global Challenges of Standards, Engagement and Transformation is designed to contribute to discourses about how STEM teaching and learning can become more equitable, serving the needs of readers across the STEM educational spectrum. STEM21 is meant to problematize the status quo educational practices of STEM stakeholders including preservice and inservice teachers, district leaders, informal educators, policy makers, and the research community. While many books are narrowly targeted either for academics or practitioners, the outcome is limited dialogue between and across those spaces. This volume weaves together field-based research, personal narrative, and education theory, while providing for reflection and discussion. STEM21: Equity in Teaching and Learning to Meet Global Challenges of Standards, Engagement and Transformation is undergirded by the principle that engaged STEM education accommodates theory and practice that is equitable, rejects deficit model thinking, and is community relevant. Equitable STEM pedagogy builds autonomous pathways to learning; creates a culture of questioning and transparency; celebrates diversity of thought, habit and culture; and embraces a social justice stance on issues of race, class, gender, environmental responsibility, health, and access to resources.

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Chapter Two: Hip-Hop Pedagogy as a Framework to Support the Development of Science Geniuses (Edmund S. Adjapong)

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CHAPTER TWO

Hip-Hop Pedagogy as a Framework to Support the Development of Science Geniuses

EDMUND S. ADJAPONG1



Abstract

This research1 revolves around developing equitable pedagogical practices to provide urban youth, who traditionally have been marginalized in STEM disciplines, with access in STEM education. Research suggests that students from underrepresented ethnic groups traditionally fall behind their counterparts of less diverse backgrounds in major content areas, including science. In addition, urban students are less likely to be interested in the sciences partially because educators misunderstand the realities and experiences of urban students and as a result they are not able to demonstrate the relevance of science. This chapter suggests utilizing Hip-Hop/youth culture to develop effective and equitable pedagogical approaches to engage urban youth in STEM and to encourage urban students to view the field of STEM as attainable as they learn science through their culture. ← 55 | 56 →

Editorial Reflections

Research2 has shown that when performance groups are the same as play groups, individuals thrive: learners whose formal and informal, curricular and extra-curricular, social and professional experiences are seamless do better academically. Boundaries between fun and learning disappear as motivations to succeed are tied to purposes that include social interaction, affirmation and acceptance. What then are the implications for individuals standing in social margins? Outside of social circles there are fewer points of entry into academic agency. Being invited and being included are not the same...

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