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STEM21

Equity in Teaching and Learning to Meet Global Challenges of Standards, Engagement and Transformation

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Edited By Joy Barnes-Johnson and Janelle M. Johnson

STEM21: Equity in Teaching and Learning to Meet Global Challenges of Standards, Engagement and Transformation is designed to contribute to discourses about how STEM teaching and learning can become more equitable, serving the needs of readers across the STEM educational spectrum. STEM21 is meant to problematize the status quo educational practices of STEM stakeholders including preservice and inservice teachers, district leaders, informal educators, policy makers, and the research community. While many books are narrowly targeted either for academics or practitioners, the outcome is limited dialogue between and across those spaces. This volume weaves together field-based research, personal narrative, and education theory, while providing for reflection and discussion. STEM21: Equity in Teaching and Learning to Meet Global Challenges of Standards, Engagement and Transformation is undergirded by the principle that engaged STEM education accommodates theory and practice that is equitable, rejects deficit model thinking, and is community relevant. Equitable STEM pedagogy builds autonomous pathways to learning; creates a culture of questioning and transparency; celebrates diversity of thought, habit and culture; and embraces a social justice stance on issues of race, class, gender, environmental responsibility, health, and access to resources.

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Chapter Five: Early Engagement in Research as a Tool for Broadening Science Participation (Cassie Xu / Robert Newton / Margaret Turrin / Susan Vincent)

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CHAPTER FIVE

Early Engagement in Research as a Tool for Broadening Science Participation

CASSIE XU,1 ROBERT NEWTON,2 MARGARET TURRIN,3 AND SUSAN VINCENT4

This research was supported as part of a larger NSF funded study #HRD-1561637



Abstract

Despite significant investments at multiple levels in educational infrastructure, technology, and targeted engagement, a significant gap remains in the recruitment and retention of African-American, Latinx, and Native American students in sciences courses, majors and careers. This gap is evident at our own institution, ← 114 | 115 → the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) of Columbia University, which is one of North America’s premier scientific campuses, where a painfully small number of students and faculty are from underrepresented communities. Over the past 14 years, an educational outreach effort, the Secondary School Field Research Program (SSFRP), has developed more-or-less organically at Lamont. The program has had significant success in bringing students from under-represented ethnic and economic groups to its campus for immersive field-science research and in recruiting them into science majors at four-year colleges. We’re doing this through a simple but strategic combination of activities that create a multi-layered and flexible network of relationships in which students can establish supportive communities for learning and growth.

Editorial Reflections

I, Joy, was accepted into Cornell University‘s Minority Introduction to Engineering Program as a junior in high school. It provided Black and Brown students with a residential experience on...

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