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Competition, Community, and Educational Growth

Contemporary Perspectives on Competitive Speech and Debate

Edited By Kristopher Copeland and Garret L. Castleberry

Competition, Community, and Educational Growth: Contemporary Perspectives on Competitive Speech and Debate is an up-to-date text providing informed academic thought concerning the impact of forensics. Its primary focus is to demonstrate how the forensic activity allows students to actively engage and learn outside the classroom. Specifically, Competition, Community, and Educational Growth focuses on how students educationally grow through the activity. The book frames methods and pedagogy as best practices to provide educational growth for students and explicitly connect learning outcomes for students. Coming from the perspective of higher educational instructors, the book provides insight beyond the high school experience. Competition, Community, and Educational Growth examines contemporary perspectives on competitive speech and debate theory, experience, and methods of instruction.

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Chapter 2: Narrative Ethnographies of Cultural Change and Coaching Challenges in High-Turnover Programs (Garret L. Castleberry / Stephanie Schartel Dunn)

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CHAPTER   TWO

Narrative Ethnographies of Cultural Change and Coaching Challenges in High-Turnover Programs

GARRET L. CASTLEBERRY AND STEPHANIE SCHARTEL DUNN

 

There is one shared recurrence across academia reflective of life experience in general: change is inevitable. All things function in and through cycles. There are certain understood cycles that accompany a career in education. Students enter and exit degree programs in relative succession, which are typically increments of two to four or sometimes five or more years. On the other hand, the purported representation of “stability” is projected by the concrete permanence of those operating at the upper levels: educators, administrators, and coaches. Students may come to mythologize certain aspects of the security and privilege held by particular positions of authority, especially when leadership figures mentor, educate, and even mold individual perceptions of identity.

What type of identity or culture can be cultivated when a coaching staff circulates as often—if not more frequently—than the student body? Such is a tale these authors seek to tell. Our quest for insights comes from a shared origin at the University of Oklahoma. We both served in the primary position as Director of Forensics (DOF). We both coached teams under the contract of Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA). We even shared some of the same bright and dynamic students in our cabal of a competitive speech and debate program. In the course of divergence, we each practiced different approaches,...

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