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Competition, Community, and Educational Growth

Contemporary Perspectives on Competitive Speech and Debate

Edited By Kristopher Copeland and Garret L. Castleberry

Competition, Community, and Educational Growth: Contemporary Perspectives on Competitive Speech and Debate is an up-to-date text providing informed academic thought concerning the impact of forensics. Its primary focus is to demonstrate how the forensic activity allows students to actively engage and learn outside the classroom. Specifically, Competition, Community, and Educational Growth focuses on how students educationally grow through the activity. The book frames methods and pedagogy as best practices to provide educational growth for students and explicitly connect learning outcomes for students. Coming from the perspective of higher educational instructors, the book provides insight beyond the high school experience. Competition, Community, and Educational Growth examines contemporary perspectives on competitive speech and debate theory, experience, and methods of instruction.

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Chapter 3: The Road to Critical Consciousness Is Paved with Smelly Socks: Travel Time as a Site of Torpification in Forensics (Steven K. Farias / C. Kyle Rudick / Josh Hamzehee)

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CHAPTER   THREE

The Road to Critical Consciousness Is Paved with Smelly Socks: Travel Time as a Site of Torpification in Forensics

STEVEN K. FARIAS, C. KYLE RUDICK, AND JOSH HAMZEHEE

 

OF VAN RIDES AND THE DEATH PENALTY: KYLE’S MOMENT OF TORPIFICATION

The display of free CDs was small, near the gas station’s register, and undisturbed—likely the result of customer disinterest. I certainly hadn’t noticed it when buying my chips. Bill paid for his snacks, his Oklahoma drawl pronounced as he offered a “thank’ya ma’am” to the register attendant. As we walked toward the van, he looked at me and, holding aloft a CD exclaimed, “Dude, this is going to be great.”

We climbed into the team’s 16-passenger van—our means of travel for the past six hours. It was crammed full of luggage and people. The smell of perfume and deodorant didn’t mask the sour smell of stale socks and sweaty bodies. A normal person would have held their nose, shook their head, and quickly backed away, but we weren’t normal people. We were a forensic team. Van rides to and from tournaments were standard and we had learned to deal with it.

“What do you think you’re doing?” Amy, our coach said, while Bill shoved the CD into the player.

“You’ll see, it’s going to be great,” Bill reiterated, nearly bouncing with glee. At that moment, an organ...

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