Show Less

Creation, Publishing, and Criticism

The Advance of Women’s Writing

Series:

Edited By Maria Xesus Nogueira, Laura Lojo Rodriguez and Manuela Palacios

Since the 1980s, there has been an unprecedented and unremitting rise in the number of women writers in Galicia and Ireland. Publishers, critics, journals, and women’s groups have played a decisive role in this phenomenon. Creation, Publishing, and Criticism provides a plurality of perspectives on the strategies deployed by the various cultural agents in the face of the advance of women authors and brings together a selection of articles by writers, publishers, critics, and theatre professionals who delve into their experiences during this process of cultural change. This collection of essays sets out to show how, departing from comparable circumstances, the Galician and the Irish literary systems explore their respective new paths in ways that are pertinent to each other. This book will be of particular interest to students of Galician and Irish studies, comparative literature, women’s studies, and literary criticism. Both specialists in cultural analysis and the common reader will find this an enlightening book.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

MARÍA XESÚS NOGUEIRA / LAURA LOJO / MANUELA PALACIOS Writers, Publishers, and Critics in Galicia and Ireland: an entente cordiale? 1

Extract

María Xesús Nogueira, Laura Lojo, Manuela Palacios Writers, Publishers, and Critics in Galicia and Ireland: an entente cordiale? The Steadfast Advance Since the 1980s, there has been an unprecedented and unremitting rise in the number of women writers in Galicia and Ireland. Patricia Boyle Haberstroh and Christine St. Peter (2007) maintain that a number of publishers, critics, journals and women’s groups have played a decisive role in this phenomenon in Ireland, a view that the editors of the present book endorse. In Galicia, feminist journals like Festa da palabra silenciada and Andaina helped to shape and develop feminist thought, thus creating a propitious climate for the reception of women writers. Other cultural forces, however, have been reluctant to accept the concomitant transformation of both literatures. Thus, the last two decades in Ireland have been marked by, among other issues, the controversy about the anomalously low representation of women writers in The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing (Deane et al. 1991), a debate that the additional two volumes on women writers (Bourke 2002) did not altogether appease. In Galicia, the presence of women writers in anthologies was very sparse until the 1990s. The most emblematic poetry anthology in the 1980s, Desde a palabra doce voces. Nova poesía galega [The Word in Twelve Voices. New Galician Poetry] (Rodríguez Gómez 1986), only included one woman, Pilar Pallarés. An overview of fiction and drama in publishers’ catalogues of the last three decades reveals a similar scarcity of...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.