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The Use of Modal Expression Preference as a Marker of Style and Attribution

The Case of William Tyndale and the 1533 English "Enchiridion Militis Christiani</I>

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Elizabeth Bell Canon

Can an author’s preference for expressing modality be quantified and then used as a marker of attribution? This book explores the possibility of using the subjunctive mood as an indicator of style and a marker of authorship in Early Modern English texts. Using three works by the sixteenth-century biblical translator and polemicist, William Tyndale, Elizabeth Bell Canon establishes a predictable preference for certain types of modal expression. The theory of subjunctive use as a marker of attribution was then tested on the anonymous 1533 English translation of Erasmus’ Enchiridion Militis Christiani. Also included in this book is a modern English spelling version Tyndale’s The Parable of the Wicked Mammon.

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ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS ix

Extract

Abbreviations and Symbols EEOB Early English Books Online Infl. Subj. Inflected Subjunctive KJV King James Version Mod. Aux. Modal Auxiliary Mod. Pret. Modal Preterite Nondist. Non-distinct form pl. Plural sg. Singular 1/2/3 First person, second person, third person

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