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Tertullian’s Use of the Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, James, 1 and 2 Peter, and Jude

Series:

Mark A. Frisius

In Tertullian’s Use of the Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, James, 1 and 2 Peter, and Jude, Mark A. Frisius establishes that Tertullian (a third-century theologian) only used the Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, and 1 Peter, although he at least knew of Jude. It is further demonstrated that he had no knowledge of James or 2 Peter, which has a distinct bearing on the emergence of the New Testament canon. Tertullian interprets these five texts in various ways, but always with an eye toward confrontational discourse. The author assesses Tertullian’s varying interpretive principles and also considers the effects of Montanism on his interpretive procedures. In conclusion, Frisius demonstrates that the Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, and 1 Peter provided Tertullian with significant material for his theological controversies. This book, in addition to being a resource for scholars, is also useful in senior level and graduate courses on ancient biblical interpretation.

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Series Editor‘s Preface ix

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SERIES EDITOR‘S PREFACE More than ever the horizons in biblical literature are being expanded beyond that which is immediately imagined; important new methodological, theological, and hermeneutical directions are being explored, often resulting in significant contributions to the world of biblical scholarship. It is an exciting time for the academy as engagement in biblical studies continues to be heightened. This series seeks to make available to scholars and institutions, scholarship of a high order, and which will make a significant contribution to the ongoing biblical discourse. This series includes established and innovative directions, covering general and particular areas in biblical study. For every volume considered for this series, we explore the question as to whether the study will push the horizons of biblical scholarship. The answer must be yes for inclusion. In this volume, Mark Frisius explores the manner in which Tertullian has interpreted particular New Testament books and the subsequent shaping of his theology. This study fills an important void in this regard, and as Frisius has ably demonstrated in this study, the paucity of material regarding Tertullian engagement with 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Hebews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter and Jude underestimates the importance of these in shaping Tertullian‘s theological and doctrinal perspectives. The author investigates copiously three principal questions: (1) the knowledge that Tertullian had of certain New Testament books; (2) Tertullian‘s exegetical approaches; (3) the manner in which these books informed Tertullian‘s theological thought. This work has demonstrated unequivocally and with clarity...

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