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Tertullian’s Use of the Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, James, 1 and 2 Peter, and Jude

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Mark A. Frisius

In Tertullian’s Use of the Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, James, 1 and 2 Peter, and Jude, Mark A. Frisius establishes that Tertullian (a third-century theologian) only used the Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, and 1 Peter, although he at least knew of Jude. It is further demonstrated that he had no knowledge of James or 2 Peter, which has a distinct bearing on the emergence of the New Testament canon. Tertullian interprets these five texts in various ways, but always with an eye toward confrontational discourse. The author assesses Tertullian’s varying interpretive principles and also considers the effects of Montanism on his interpretive procedures. In conclusion, Frisius demonstrates that the Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, and 1 Peter provided Tertullian with significant material for his theological controversies. This book, in addition to being a resource for scholars, is also useful in senior level and graduate courses on ancient biblical interpretation.

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Appendix One: Possible Citations of the Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, and Jude 127

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APPENDIX ONE Possible Citations of the Pastoral Epistles, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, and Jude This appendix lists the possible scriptural citations culled from CCL and BP. The passages are listed in numerical order. The list begins with the books James, 2 Peter and Jude, as there are few possible citations of these books. Following this, the remaining books are listed in scriptural order. The column ―reason for rejection‖ denotes the particular reason for which a passage is not placed within the category of certain. Key for “Reason for rejection” Spurious A—Tertullian presents different theological content B—Tertullian claims that he is alluding to a different passage or author C—No point of connection between the text and the passage from Tertullian D—There is no linguistic similarity E—The citation does not fit the parameters of his argument Questionable A—Tertullian‘s allusion may come from a number of other potential passages B—Tertullian alludes to a common scriptural theme C—Tertullian alludes to a common Christian practice D—The given citation does not fit the parameters of his argument E—Tertullian follows a different train of thought than the scriptural passage F—Tertullian‘s allusion may come from a single other passage Appendix One 128 G—His possible allusion is significantly different from other quota- tions of the same passage Probable A—The scriptural passage closely resembles another passage, and there is no indication of the source B—The scriptural passage presents a common theological theme...

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