Show Less

Women and Malay Voices

Undercurrent Murmurings in Indonesia’s Colonial Past

Series:

Tineke Hellwig

Women and Malay Voices examines Malay literature by Chinese peranakan authors in the Dutch East Indies between 1915 and 1940. The narratives, some of them based on sensational murder trials reported in the news, offer insights into women’s lives and experiences and glimpses of female agency. With its primary focus on Malay texts and Asian women, this book offers a unique opportunity to hear subaltern voices and understand the lives of colonized women in new ways. Using feminist and postcolonial theories, this study juxtaposes the Malay texts with Dutch fiction and newspaper accounts to gain insight into how gender, race, and class are represented and what ideologies marked power relations in Dutch East Indies society.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Note on Foreign Words and Spelling xv

Extract

Note on Foreign Words and Spelling For the sake of readability I use the term Indies (as a noun and as an adjective) to indicate the Dutch East Indies. The term Indonesia (and the adjective Indonesian) is used to refer to the geographical region that is present-day Indonesia, even though during the period under discussion Indonesia as a political entity did not yet exist. Peranakan is defined as mixed-blood Chinese, in most cases meaning descendants of a Chinese male immigrant and an indigenous woman. At times peranakan also refers to full-blood Chinese who were born and raised in the Indies and therefore acculturated to Indies society and customs. Peranakan are considered to be a different group from totok (full-blood) Chinese born in China, as well as from indigenous Indonesians. Indo is defined as mixed-blood Eurasian, in most cases referring to the descendants of a European (Dutch) male colonizer and an indigenous woman. At times Indo also refers to a full-blood European who was born and raised in the Indies and therefore acculturated to Indies society and customs. Indos are considered distinctly different from totok (full-blood) Europeans as well as from indigenous Indonesians. Dutch and Malay terms are translated into English when they appear in the text for the first time. Terms that are used more than once are listed in the glossary. For the spelling of Malay words and names I applied the following principles. Malay words and place names follow the spelling as it appears in the edition of...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.