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Andrew of Bethsaida and the Johannine Circle

The Muratorian Tradition and the Gospel Text

Series:

James Patrick

This book is a reading of the text of the Gospel of John in light of a tradition of Johannine authorship represented by the Muratorian Fragment, Papias of Hierapolis, and the Anti-Marcionite Prologue, all which are taken to reflect the influence of a common tradition represented by Jerome, Clement of Alexandria, and Victorinus of Pettau. Taken together these suggest that the Gospel of John was the work of the late first- or early second-century John the Presbyter who mediated the tradition of a distinctive group of Johannine disciples among whom Andrew was most important.

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P R E F A C E

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ore than ever the horizons in biblical literature are being expanded beyond that which is immediately imagined; important new methodological, theological, and hermeneutical directions are being explored, often resulting in significant contributions to the world of biblical scholarship. It is an exciting time for the academy as engagement in biblical studies continues to be heightened. This series seeks to make available to scholars and institutions, scholarship of a high order, and which will make a significant contribution to the ongoing biblical discourse. This series includes established and innovative directions, covering general and particular areas in biblical study. For every volume considered for this series, we explore the question as to whether the study will push the horizons of biblical scholarship. The answer must be yes for inclusion. In this volume, James Patrick explores the historical context of the Gospel of John and brings once again in the theological discourse on the Gospel of John, a careful and intentional argument. The author contends that the author of the Gospel is the son of Zebedee and in itself this argument will face challenges from the now well established consensus that the authorship belongs to John the Apostle. Perhaps somewhat counter intuitively then, it is precisely this reality that generates this renewed interest, and I propose to you that this study by Patrick will again renew the scholarly conversation, and regardless of the conclusion that is drawn, the very conversation itself has great merit. Scholars who are engaged in this area of scholarship...

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