Show Less

Translators as Storytellers

A Study in Septuagint Translation Technique

Series:

John A. Beck

In the third century B.C.E., translators began retelling the stories of the Hebrew Bible in Greek. The Septuagint was born but its analysis had just begun. To date, most Septuagint translation technique analysis has focused on the linguistic sensitivity of these translators, but there is more to storytelling than linguistics. Translators as Storytel lers addresses the literary sensitivity of the translators, thus, expanding the tradition of translation technique analysis to include the translator’s replication of characterization, time, the patterning play of words, and the artful use of geography.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

BM 229

Extract

Studies in Biblical Literature This series invites manuscripts from scholars in any area of biblical literature. Both established and innovative methodolo- gies, covering general and particular areas in biblical study, are welcome. The series seeks to make available studies that will make a significant contribution to the ongoing biblical discourse. Scholars who have interests in gender and sociocultural hermeneutics are particularly encouraged to consider this series. For further information about the series and for the submission of manuscripts, contact: Hemchand Gossai Department of Philosophy and Religion Culver-Stockton College Canton, MO 63435 To order other books in this series, please contact our Customer Service Department: (800) 770-LANG (within the U.S.) (212) 647-7706 (outside the U.S.) (212) 647-7707 FAX or browse online by series at: WWW. PETER LANG. COM This page intentionally left blank In the third century B.C.E., translators began retelling the stories of the Hebrew Bible in Greek. The Septuagint was born but its analysis had just begun. To date, most Septuagint translation technique analysis has focused on the linguistic sensitivity of these translators, but there is more to storytelling than linguistics. Translators as Storytellers addresses the literary sensitivity of the translators, thus, expanding the tradition of translation technique analysis to include the transla- tor's replication of characterization, time, the patterning play of words, and the artful use of geography. "A knowledge of ancient translation technique has great value in deriving historical and theological insights from a text or in observing grammatical and lexical features that a text may exhibit....

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.