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Humanitarianism, Communications and Change

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Edited By Simon Cottle and Glenda Cooper

Humanitarianism, Communications and Change is the first book to explore humanitarianism in today’s rapidly changing media and communications environment. Based on the latest academic thinking alongside a range of professional, expert and insider views, the book brings together some of the most authoritative voices in the field today. It examines how the fast-changing nature of communications throws up new challenges but also new possibilities for humanitarian relief and intervention. It includes case studies deployed in recent humanitarian crises, and significant new communication developments including social media, crisis mapping, SMS alerts, big data and new hybrid communications. And against the backdrop of an increasingly globalized and threat-filled world, the book explores how media and communications, both old and new, are challenging traditional relations of communication power.

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Introduction: Humanitarianism, Communications, and Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Simon Cottle and Glenda Cooper Part One: Humanitarianism and Communications in a Changing World Chapter One: Humanitarianism, Human Insecurity, and Communications: What’s Changing in a Globalised World? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Simon Cottle Chapter Two: Media Futures and Humanitarian Perspectives in an Age of Uncertainty and Complexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Randolph Kent Chapter Three: From Buerk to Ushahidi: Changes in TV Reporting of Humanitarian Crises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Richard Sambrook Chapter Four: Digital Humanitarianism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Paul Conneally vi | table of contents Part Two: Cash, Charity, and Communication Chapter Five: ‘Give us your ****ing money’: A Critical Appraisal of TV and the Cash Nexus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Glenda Cooper Chapter Six: NGOs, Media, and Public Understanding 25 Years On: An Interview with Paddy Coulter, Former Head of Media, Oxfam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Paddy Coulter with Glenda Cooper Chapter Seven: 3,000 Words that Explain How to Build a Powerful Fanbase, Make Your Message Go Viral, and Raise Millions for Your Cause . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Liz Scarff Part Three: The Politics of Pity and the Poverty of Representation Chapter Eight: International NGOs, Global Poverty, and the Representations of Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Nandita Dogra Chapter Nine: Underline, Celebrate, Mitigate, Erase: Humanitarian NGOs’ Strategies of Communicating Difference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Shani Orgad Chapter Ten: Solidarity in the Age of Post-humanitarianism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Lilie Chouliaraki Part Four: NGO Communications: Impacts, Audiences, and Media Ecology Chapter Eleven: From Pictures to Policy: How Does Humanitarian Reporting Have an Influence? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Suzanne Franks Chapter Twelve: Learning from the Public: UK Audiences’ Responses to Humanitarian Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Irene Bruna Seu...

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