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Defining Critical Animal Studies

An Intersectional Social Justice Approach for Liberation

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Edited By Anthony J. Nocella, John Sorenson, Kim Socha and Atsuko Matsuoka

This is the first book to define the philosophical and practical parameters of critical animal studies (CAS). Rooted in anarchist perspectives that oppose all systems of domination and authoritarianism, CAS both challenges anthropocentrism and presents animal liberation as a social justice movement that intersects with other movements for positive change. Written by a collection of internationally respected scholar-activists, each chapter expands upon the theory and practice underlying the total liberation approach, the roles of academics and activists, and the ten principles of CAS. With apolitical animal studies and exploitative animal research dominating higher education, this book offers a timely counter-narrative that demands the liberation of all oppressed beings and the environment. Defining Critical Animal Studies will interest educators, students, activists, community members, and policy makers seeking accessible theory that can be put into action.
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3 Until All Are Free: Total Liberation through Revolutionary Decolonization, Groundless Solidarity, and a Relationship Framework Sarat Colling, Sean Parson, and Alessandro Arrigoni

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Until All Are Free

Total Liberation through Revolutionary Decolonization, Groundless Solidarity, and a Relationship Framework

Sarat Colling, Sean Parson, and Alessandro Arrigoni

On April 28, 2012, about one thousand activists descended on the Green Hill breeding facility, a supplier of animals owned by U.S.-based multinational Marshall Bioresources, located in Northern Italy. After a torchlight vigil, one activist managed to climb over the fence and reach the gate of the farm. Although there were riot police deployed outside the fence, once activists were inside they were able to reach the cages and remove the dogs. The action culminated in the now iconic moment in which beagles were lifted over the wire fencing, over the heads of police officers, and into the hands of activists and caring veterinarians. The public outcry in Italy against Green Hill is only one incidence in a growing movement against the practice of vivisection. Activists in Italy against Green Hill, in the United States against Huntingdon Life Sciences, and in Asia against bear-bile farming are not only resisting the torture of animals but also are protesting capitalism, state power, and the structures of contemporary life that keep us all oppressed. It is this intersection that this chapter looks to examine.

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