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Advances in Intergroup Communication

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Howard Giles and Anne Maass

Advances in Intergroup Communication is a timely contribution to the field. It reflects developments in older, more established intergroup settings (e.g., gender, sexual orientation, organizations) whilst introducing newer studies such as the military and political parties. It also pays attention to emerging trends in new media and social networks and considers the developing field of neuroscience of communication.
The volume brings together authors from different geographical areas (North America, Europe, and Australia) and from different disciplines (particularly communication, linguistics, and psychology). Contributions are organized around five themes, corresponding to the five sections of the book: defining features and constraints; tools of intergroup communication; social groups in their context; intergroup communication in organizations; and future directions.
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Chapter Eighteen: Conceptualizing the Diversity of Intergroup Settings: The Web Model

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← 300 | 301 →CHAPTER EIGHTEEN

Conceptualizing the Diversity of Intergroup Settings

The Web Model

MARTIN EHALA, HOWARD GILES, AND JAKE HARWOOD

As this volume amply illustrates, there are myriad grossly different intergroup settings, each with their own unique histories, demographics, tensions and so forth. In this chapter, we elaborate upon a prior conceptual attempt to bring order to this mosaic (Giles, Reid, & Harwood, 2010; see also the content stereotype model, Cuddy, Fiske, & Glick, 2007, 2008) by recourse to a so-called Web Model of multiple dimensions characterizing intergroup settings that could lay the foundations for future cross-setting comparisons as well as provide an important framework for future research. In introducing this model, we briefly and illustratively refer to the array of social groups that permeate this volume as well as foreground the model in a case study of Russian-speakers in the Baltic nations.

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