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Transforming Education

Global Perspectives, Experiences and Implications

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Edited By Robert A. DeVillar, Binbin Jiang and Jim Cummins

This research-based volume presents a substantive, panoramic view of ways in which Australia and countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and North and South America engage in educational programs and practices to transform the learning processes and outcomes of their students. It reveals and analyzes national and global trajectories in key areas of educational development, and enhances readers’ understanding of the nature and complexity of educational transformation in a global context. The book’s comprehensive analysis of factors associated with transforming education within globally representative geographical, cultural, and political contexts contributes to critical scholarship; its discussion of individual country findings and cross-country patterns has significant implications for educational practitioners and leaders. The volume has direct practical relevance for educational practitioners and leaders, policymakers, and researchers, as nations remain in dire need of effective ways and means to transform their respective educational systems to (1) more ably realize educational equity, (2) make learning relevant to an increasingly diverse overall student populace, (3) ensure individual and general prosperity, and (4) promote substantive global collaboration in developing the new economy.
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Introduction: Robert A. DeVillar, Binbin Jiang, & Jim Cummins

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Robert A. DeVillar, Binbin Jiang, & Jim Cummins

 

This volume presents a substantive view of ways in which Australia and countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and North and South America are engaged in educational programs and practices that transform the learning processes and outcomes of their respective student populations—and, in one case, of student teachers from other countries—and, in so doing, their respective national and global trajectories in key areas of development. The purpose of this introduction, however, is, first, to place the role of education within its current complex and highly politicized global context, particularly in the wake of a 3-decade global embrace of neoliberalism-cum-corporatism and disaffection with social democracy (see Scruton, 2007, for working definitions of these terms); second, to gauge that trend’s deleterious economic effects on the middle class and poor in traditional advanced economies; and third, to relate the above two realities to the concomitant national and geopolitical uncertainties that have ensued. The alternative model, termed by some the new economy (Cavanagh & Broad, 2012), emphasizes efforts toward globalization that are “economically equitable, authentically democratic, and ecologically sound” (Hunter & Yates, 2002).

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