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Working for Social Justice Inside and Outside the Classroom

A Community of Students, Teachers, Researchers, and Activists

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Edited By Nancye E. McCrary and E. Wayne Ross

What were once distinct professions for serving others and building knowledge are now communities of workers struggling against a tide of increasingly unregulated capitalism that is being fed by human greed. Teachers have become education workers, joining a working class that is rapidly falling behind and that is increasingly being silenced by the power elite who control nearly all the wealth that once supported a thriving middle class. Working for Social Justice Inside and Outside the Classroom delivers critical counter-narratives aimed at resisting the insatiable greed of a few and supporting a common good for most. The book is dedicated to hopeful communities working against perpetual war, the destruction of our natural environment, increasing poverty, and social inequalities as they fight to preserve democratic ideals in a just and sustainable world. Written by some of the most influential thinkers of our time, this collection is a tapestry of social justice issues woven in and out of formal and informal education.
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Chapter Six: Reclaiming Our Indigenous Worldview: A More Authentic Baseline for Social/Ecological Justice Work in Education

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← 92 | 93 →

 

SIX

Reclaiming Our Indigenous Worldview: A More Authentic Baseline for Social/Ecological Justice Work in Education

Four Arrows and Darcia Narvaez

A baseline is a clearly defined starting point (point of departure)from where implementation begins, improvement is judged, or comparison is made.—The Business Dictionary

All humans have a two million year-old person inside and if we lose contactwith that part of us, we lose our real roots.—Carl Jung1

…the most practical and important thing about a man is still his view of the universe.…We think the question is not whether the theory of the cosmos affects matters, but whether, in the long run, anything else affects them.—G. K. Chesterton (1986, p. 41)

I think we’re on the brink of disaster on many fronts. I believe that the Native people can help us out of that, help push us back away from that brink.—N. Scott Momaday (1992, p. 89) ← 93 | 94 →

A More Authentic Baseline

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