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Global Media Literacy in a Digital Age

Teaching Beyond Borders


Belinha S. De Abreu and Melda N. Yildiz

How do we connect with one another? How do the media portray different cultures and beliefs? What messages are often omitted from media? How do we connect what we see in the worldwide media to the classroom? This book, divided into four parts, serves to answer many of these questions. In Part 1, readers are provided with a historical look at media literacy education while glimpsing the future of this educational movement. Part 2 curates voices from around the globe, from practitioners to researchers, who provide a look at issues that are of consequence in our worldwide society. Part 3 focuses on education through cases studies that give educational perspectives and assessment opportunities. The final section, «Take Action», offers the reader resources for growing global media literacy around the world. This timely resource provides a look at how media literacy education has become a global and interconnected dialogue brought about by the evolution of technology.
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3. Global Media Events and Moments


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3.  Global Media Events and Moments


“It might come as a surprise to you that some of history’s greatest American journalists are working right now, exceptional minds with years of experience and an unshakeable devotion to reporting the news. But these voices are a small minority now and they don’t stand a chance against the circus when the circus comes to town. They’re overmatched. I’m quitting the circus and switching teams. I’m going with the guys who are getting creamed. I’m moved that they still think they can win and I hope they can teach me a thing or two. From this moment on, we’ll be deciding what goes on our air and how it’s presented to you based on the simple truth that nothing is more important to a democracy than a well-informed electorate. We’ll endeavor to put information in a broader context because we know that very little news is born at the moment it comes across our wire. We’ll be the champion of facts and the mortal enemy of innuendo, speculation, hyperbole, and nonsense. We’re not waiters in a restaurant serving you the stories you asked for just the way you like them prepared. Nor are we computers dispensing only the facts because news is only useful in the context of humanity. I’ll make no effort to subdue my personal opinions. I will make every effort to expose you to informed opinions that are different...

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