Show Less
Restricted access

Curriculum

Decanonizing the Field

Series:

Edited By João M. Paraskeva and Shirley R. Steinberg

Curriculum: Decanonizing the Field is a fresh and innovative collection that is concerned with the totalitarian Western Eurocentric cult that has dominated the field of curriculum studies. Contributors to this volume challenge dominant and counter-dominant curriculum positions of the Western Eurocentric epistemic platform. At a time when the field laudably claims internationalization as a must, arguments presented in this volume prove that this «internationalization» is nothing more than the new Western expansionism, one that dominates all other cultures, economies and knowledges. Curriculum: Decanonizing the Field is a clarion call against curriculum epistemicides, proposing the use of Itinerant Curriculum Theory (ICT), which opens up the canon of knowledge; challenges and destroys the coloniality of power, knowledge and being; and transforms the very idea and practice of power. The volume is essential reading for anyone involved in one of the most important battles for curriculum relevance – the fact that there is no social justice without cognitive justice.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Acknowledgments

Extract



The following chapters have been reprinted by permission.

Chapter 2. “Dewey and the Herbartians: The Genesis of a Theory of Curriculum” by Herbert Kliebard in Pinar, William (ed.), Contemporary Curriculum Discourses: Twenty Years of JCT (pp. 68–80). New York: Peter Lang. Chapter 8. “Dialectics and the Development of Curriculum Theory” by Henry Giroux in Pinar, William (ed.), Contemporary Curriculum Discourses: Twenty Years of JCT (pp. 7–23). New York: Peter Lang. Chapter 9. “Autobiography and an Architecture of Self” by William Pinar in Pinar, William, Autobiography, Politics and Sexuality: Essays in Curriculum Theory, 1972–1992. New York: Peter Lang. Chapter 14. “Revisiting the Question of the ‘Indigenous’” by George J. Sefa Dei in Dei, George Sefa (ed.), Indigenous Philosphies and Critical Education. A Critical Reader (pp. 21–33). New York: Peter Lang. Chapter 18. “Ideology and Methodological Attitude” by Patti Lather in Pinar, William (ed.), Contemporary Curriculum Discourses: Twenty Years of JCT (pp. 246–261). New York: Peter Lang. Chapter 22. “Early Education as a Gendered Construction” by Shirley Steinberg in Pinar, William (ed.), Contemporary Curriculum Discourses: Twenty Years of JCT (pp. 474–480). New York: Peter Lang.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.