Show Less
Restricted access

Children Count

Exploring What is Possible in a Classroom with Mathematics and Children

Series:

Mary M. Stordy

Children Count is an interpretive exploration into the teaching of mathematics to children. Through the use of narratives to make meaning of particular pedagogic events, the book explores the possibilities that exist for children and for teachers if mathematics is allowed to thrive in schools as a living human enterprise. Such a re-conceptualized view of mathematics challenges the status quo and results in a different image of schooling. Children Count gives the reader a picture of what a classroom could look like when it includes creativity, inquiry-based learning, empowerment of children and teachers, academic rigor, holism, and integrated and generative curricula. The text captures the mistakes, choices, the actions, and the decision-making process of a teacher who reflects and learns from her students as she realizes she must listen to them because what they have to say counts.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Preface

Extract



Children Count is an interpretive exploration into the teaching of mathematics to children. Through the use of narratives to make meaning of pedagogic events, this is a book that considers the possibilities that exist for children and for teachers if mathematics is allowed to thrive in schools as a living human enterprise. Such a reconceptualized view of mathematics challenges the status quo and results in a different image of schooling. It is an image that is messier, requires more of the teacher, and expects more from students. President Barack Obama wants the American educational community to “educate to innovate.” The struggle many teachers and parents have is that they are not sure what that phrase actually means in action. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics—STEM—has become a familiar term in the United States and Canada in the past few years, and is quickly catching hold in other parts of the global community. The following chapters you are about to read had elements of STEM teaching and learning with younger children long before the term was really known. What needs to shift in schools framed in an industrial age—despite all that we know about learning and children—that now exist in a time in which inquiring into STEM education has political and economic thrust and the power to transform the kinds of thinkers our schools can foster? While the intention of the text is concerned primarily ← XIII | XIV → with mathematics teaching and learning, elements of STEM teaching...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.