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Critically Researching Youth

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Edited By Shirley R. Steinberg and Awad Ibrahim

Critically Researching Youth addresses the unique possibilities and contexts involved in deepening a discourse around youth. Authors address both social theoretical and methodological approaches as they delve into a contemporary discipline, which supports research with – not on – young adults. This volume is a refreshing change in the literature on qualitative youth, embodying the understanding of what it means to be a young woman or man. It dismisses any consideration to pathologize youth, instead addressing what society can understand and how we can act in order to support and promote them.
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About the Contributors

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Mary Frances Agnello is currently an associate professor at Akita International University in Japan. She has been faculty in Foundations of Education, Teacher Education, and Curriculum Studies at The University of Texas at San Antonio and was tenured at Texas Tech University. She is teaching writing and literature in the English for Academic Purposes Department as Liberal Arts faculty at AIU and continuing to research discourses of language, literacy, and culture, as well as educational policy and comparative education.

Adriana Alfano is a French immersion teacher at the elementary level in the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board. She has a background in English and French, and is a graduate of the University of Ottawa and Glendon College of York University. Her interests include: languages, music, dance, improv comedy, integrated arts education, and critical pedagogy. 

Marcelle Cacciattolo is a sociologist and an Associate Professor in the College of Education at Victoria University. Marcelle teaches in both preservice teacher and postgraduate teacher education programs. Marcelle’s particular research interests are cross-disciplinary involving health sciences and education-based research. Her research is linked to wellbeing, inclusive education, social justice, and authentic teaching and learning pedagogies. ← 285 | 286 →

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