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The Critical Graduate Experience

An Ethics of Higher Education Responsibilities

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Charlotte Achieng-Evensen, Janae Dimick, Ndindi Kitonga, Maryann Krikorian, Kevin Stockbridge and Barry Kanpol

The Critical Graduate Experience is a collection of scholarly reflections on the possibilities of a new vision for critical studies. It is a remarkable book that provides daring analyses from the vantage of the graduate student experience. Drawing from individual knowledge and research, the authors invite you to re-imagine education for justice. Barry Kanpol opens the work with a brilliant meditation on joy and cynicism in university classrooms and educational theory. The book continues to unfold as an open and honest conversation with doctoral students and recent graduates concerning the ethics of higher education. In a true critical approach, each chapter problematizes a new facet of academic assumptions and practices as they touch the lives of students. The authors explore the ethical implications of acknowledging student spirituality and expanding the role of critical education studies. The book concludes with a transparent self-critique on the process and ethics of graduate students writing for publication. This is a wonderful text, guiding students and professors as they enter into dialogue on the ethics of an authentic critical education studies. Classes on practical ethics, educational spirituality, student voice, collaborative publishing, and critical pedagogy could benefit from the insights offered here. Daring to believe that student experience and knowledge have a place in the world of academic publishing, this book is both a prophetic proclamation of and humble invitation to a new future in the field.
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Contributors

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Charlotte Achieng-Evensen is a Kenyan -American doctoral student in education at Chapman University. She has taught in the K–12 system for the past sixteen years, spending eight of those years as an educator in Papua, New Guinea. Currently, she serves her school district as a teacher specialist. Her research interests lie in indigenous philosophies and culturally responsive research methodologies, as well as professional development for teacher practice.

Janae Dimick is a PhD student at Chapman University, where she serves as the managing editor of Issues in Teacher Education. Before starting her doctoral studies, she earned her BA in anthropology and MA in English, both at California State University, Fullerton. She currently teaches developmental writing at multiple community colleges. Her research areas are related to Critical Animal Studies, human-animal studies, ecopedagogy, and social justice. She lives with four dogs—all of whom are rescues—and her very patient husband in Southern California.

Barry Kanpol is a professor of Educational Foundations at Indiana University Purdue University, Fort Wayne. In the past, he has held chair and dean leadership positions. He has also published more than a dozen books and seventy-five articles. His primary research agendas revolve round the role of higher education ← 129 | 130 → in a growing neo-liberal society as well as the function of pre- and in-service teachers as they struggle within the current strict national accountability movement. Barry is married and has four children.

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