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Trading Zones in Environmental Education

Creating Transdisciplinary Dialogue

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Marianne E. Krasny and Justin Dillon

Environmental educators often adhere to a relatively narrow theoretical paradigm focusing on changing attitudes and knowledge, which are assumed to foster pro-environmental behaviors, which, in turn, leads to better environmental quality. This book takes a different approach to trying to understand how environmental education might influence people, their communities, and the environment. The authors view changing environmental behaviors as a «wicked» problem, that is, a problem that does not readily lend itself to solutions using existing disciplinary approaches. The book as a whole opens up new avenues for pursuing environmental education research and practice and thus expands the conversation around environmental education, behaviors, and quality. Through developing transdisciplinary research questions and conceptual paradigms, this book also suggests new practices beyond those currently used in environmental education, natural resources management, and other environmental fields.
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Acknowledgments

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We thank JoAnne Getchonis, Lars Rudstam, Randy Jackson, and the maintenance staff of the Cornell University Biological Field Station at Shackelton Point, Oneida Lake, for their warm hospitality in hosting our weekend transdisciplinary research workshop. We sincerely thank Shuli Rank for her tireless and cheerful formatting over many months. We also thank the editorial and production staff at Peter Lang. This volume was funded by the Cornell University Institute for the Social Sciences. In addition, the work was supported by a joint research and extension program funded by the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (Hatch funds) and Cornell Cooperative Extension (Smith Lever funds) received from the National Institutes for Food and Agriculture (NIFA,) U.S. Department of Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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