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The Story of the Mexican Screenplay

A Study of the Invisible Art Form and Interviews with Women Screenwriters

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Maria Teresa DePaoli

The Story of the Mexican Screenplay: A Study of the Invisible Art Form and Interviews with Women Screenwriters contributes to the international development of screenplay studies. While the debate on the ontology of the screenplay continues, a fact remains clear for screenwriters: the screenplay is the film’s skeleton and the main base that sustains a story told through images. Certainly, lack of visibility, including publication, distribution, and promotion, are some of the problems that the screenplay confronts, but these are not the only challenges. Traditionally, the form has been unappreciated and regarded by many as only an initial step in the complexity of film production. In this study, the author elaborates on the cultural baggage that the screenplay carries since it is text imbued with multiple signs that – for various reasons – often get lost in the process and never make it to the screen. In this context, the author touches on the concept of adaptation since it is often a key element in screenplay research.
The Story of the Mexican Screenplay focuses on a general historical investigation of the Mexican screenplay, specifically on women’s screenwriting. In addition to screenplay analysis, the interviews with women screenwriters are revealing of various cultural issues such as gender discrimination in the work place, political censorship, collective screenwriting, and collaboration among writers, and with the director. These topics explain, in part, the double marginalization of female screenwriting in Mexico.
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Chapter Eight. The Creative Process of Collective Screenwriting, and the Standing of Screenplay in the Mexican Cinema Industry: Interview with Cecilia Pérez-Grovas and Carolina Rivera

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• CHAPTER EIGHT •

The Creative Process of Collective Screenwriting, and the Standing of Screenplay in the Mexican Cinema Industry

Interview with Cecilia Pérez-Grovas and Carolina Rivera

Francisca Cecilia Pérez-Grovas was born (1951–) in Mexico City. She completed her BA in Spanish Literature at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). She also studied screenwriting at the Film Training Center (CCC). As a student, she had the opportunity to take screenwriting courses from Gabriel García Márquez and other prominent writers, most notably Hugo Argüelles and Vicente Leñero. She began her writing career in 1995 on a high note when her screenplay Mermelada de higo [Fig Jam] was selected, enabling her to attend the Sundance screenwriting workshop. In 1997, she won the Ariel for best original screenplay for Cilantro y Perejil [Recipes to Stay Together] (1996). She wrote the script with Carolina Rivera with whom she shared the award.

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