Show Less
Restricted access

Intersectionality & Higher Education

Theory, Research, & Praxis

Donald Jr. Mitchell, Charlana Simmons and Lindsay A. Greyerbiehl

Intersectionality is a term coined by Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989. A scholar of law, critical race theory, and Black feminist thought, Crenshaw used intersectionality to explain the experiences of Black women who – because of the intersections of race, gender, and class – are exposed to exponential forms of marginalization and oppression. Intersectionality & Higher Education documents and expands upon Crenshaw’s ideas within the context of U.S. higher education. The text includes theoretical and conceptual chapters on intersectionality; empirical research using intersectionality frameworks; and chapters focusing on intersectional practices. The volume may prove beneficial for graduate programs in ethnic studies, higher education, sociology, student affairs, and women and gender studies alike.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Acknowledgments

← xiv | xv →Acknowledgments

Extract



We would like to thank those who made the publication of this text possible. First, we thank all of the chapter authors who helped shape this volume through their writings and peer reviews. Second, we thank Dr. Susan R. Jones for contributing the Foreword. Third, we thank Dr. Gregory S. Goodman, our series editor, for investing in our vision for the text. Fourth, we thank Chris Myers, Stephen Mazur, Sophie Appel, and Phyllis Korper—all at Peter Lang—for all that they brought to the production of this volume. Finally, we thank a host of family, friends, and colleagues, whose love and support keep us going each day.← xv | xvi →

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.