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Paulo Freire

The Global Legacy

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Edited By Michael A. Peters and Tina Besley

This collection is the first book devoted to Paulo Freire’s ongoing global legacy to provide an analysis of the continuing relevance and significance of Freire’s work and the impact of his global legacy. The book contains essays by some of the world’s foremost Freire scholars – McLaren, Darder, Roberts, and others – as well as chapters by scholars and activists, including the Maori scholars Graham Hingangaroa Smith and Russell Bishop, who detail their work with the indigenous people of Aotearoa-New Zealand. The book contains a foreword by Nita Freire as well as chapters from scholars around the world including Latin America, Asia, the United States, United Kingdom, New Zealand, and Australia. With a challenging introduction from the editors, Michael A. Peters and Tina Besley, this much-awaited addition to the Freire archive is highly recommended reading for all students and scholars interested in Freire, global emancipatory politics, and the question of social justice in education.
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Chapter Thirteen: Travellers in Time: A Critical Dialogue With the Gypsy Travellers of Lancashire

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CHAPTER THIRTEEN

Travellers in Time: A Critical Dialogue With the Gypsy Travellers of Lancashire

ALETHEA MELLING AND YASMEEN ALI

Education is an act of love, and thus an act of courage.

(FREIRE, P., EDUCATION FOR CRITICAL CONSCIOUSNESS, 2007, p. 33).

INTRODUCTION

The Traveller Communities of Lancashire are predominantly Romany and Irish. Their culture and language are oral rather than written. This not only limits the communities’ ability to access services, but also limits their ability to articulate their views and to understand their rights. This chapter seeks to explore how Freire’s pedagogy and the rich and colourful Traveller tradition of storytelling can be used successfully to engage the Traveller community in the production of a creative yet critical monologue that will facilitate not just reading, but reading their own reality and the development of a hopeful praxis. Moreover, it explores how the act of dialogue is an act of sharing a gift, the gift of education. In this chapter, we discuss how a group of undergraduates formed a learning community with the Travellers and how this became a vehicle for a new knowledge, leading to understanding, trust, and respect. ← 211 | 212 →

The Traveller community in the UK is complex and made up of a number of different ethnic and social groups. The generic term is Gypsy Travellers. This group consists of, first, Romany Gypsies, who have been recorded in the UK since the fifteenth century. They...

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