Show Less
Restricted access

Naturlauf

Scholarly Journeys Toward Gustav Mahler – Essays in Honour of Henry-Louis de La Grange for his 90th Birthday

Edited By Paul-André Bempéchat

This collection of essays forms the second Festschrift to honour the dean of Gustav Mahler research, Henry-Louis de La Grange, on the occasion of his ninetieth birthday. It includes vibrant, new historical, theoretical, and aesthetic research on the complex mind which produced among the best-loved orchestral works and songs of Western classical music.
Henry-Louis de La Grange's passion and tireless devotion to Gustav Mahler began when he first heard his Ninth Symphony conducted by Bruno Walter at Carnegie Hall in New York. He went on to plumb the depths of this composer's mind and soul and to explore every facet of his existence.
Among the many honours he has gleaned since the publication of the first Festschrift, Neue Mahleriana (Lang, 1997), Henry-Louis de La Grange has been named Professor by the Government of Austria (1998) and Officier de l'Ordre de la Légion d'honneur (2006). He has also been awarded Bard College's Charles Flint Kellogg Award in Arts and Letters, the Österreichisches Ehrenkreuz für Wissenschaft und Kunst, 1. Klasse (2010), the Gold Medal of the Internationale Gustav Mahler Gesellschaft (2010), and an honourary doctorate from The Juilliard School (2010). As another everlasting tribute, the American film director Jason Starr released his documentary film, For the Love of Mahler: The Inspired Life of Henry-Louis de La Grange, in 2015.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Stadien eines Wegbegleiters durch zwei Jahrzehnte: „Das himmlische Leben“ von 1892 bis 1911

Extract

Stadien eines Wegbegleiters durch zwei Jahrzehnte

„Das himmlische Leben“ von 1892 bis 1911

RENATE STARK-VOIT

Wahrscheinlich hat kein Lied seinen Komponisten länger begleitet als „Das himmlische Leben“, das Gustav Mahler Anfang 1892 in Hamburg als Klavierlied zusammen mit vier anderen „Humoresken“ schrieb und das er im Jänner 1911 in New York als Schlusssatz seiner Vierten Symphonie zum letzten Mal überarbeitete. Auch über den Text, den Gehalt, den hintersinnigen Humor und die daraus für ihn resultierende Bedeutung hat Mahler sich ungewöhnlich oft und ausführlich geäußert.



You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.