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The Concept of Divine Love in the Context of the God-World Relationship


John C. Peckham

The Concept of Divine Love in the Context of the God-World Relationship addresses the significant and far-reaching theological conflict over the nature of God’s love, which is deeply rooted in broader conflicts regarding divine ontology and the nature of the God-world relationship. After engaging the traditional historical theology of love and recent exemplars of competing and influential conceptions of divine love, John C. Peckham seeks an alternative to the impasse by an extensive inductive investigation of the entire biblical canon in accordance with a final-form canonical approach to systematic theology, offering an alternative model of divine love that draws on the richness of the biblical text as canon and holds considerable implications for the God-world relationship.
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Editor’s Preface


More than ever the horizons in biblical literature are being expanded beyond that which is immediately imagined; important new methodological, theological, and hermeneutical directions are being explored, often resulting in significant contributions to the world of biblical scholarship. It is an exciting time for the academy as engagement in biblical studies continues to be heightened.

This series seeks to make available to scholars and institutions, scholarship of a high order, and which will make a significant contribution to the ongoing biblical discourse. This series includes established and innovative directions, covering general and particular areas in biblical study. For every volume considered for this series, we explore the question as to whether the study will push the horizons of biblical scholarship. The answer must be yes for inclusion.

In this volume, John Peckham explores the Concept of Divine Love in the Context of the God-World Relationship, and provides an extensive examination of love: divine and human in a variety of contexts, biblical, theological and historical. Howsoever scholars respond to the author’s conclusions, and this study is sure to generate responses, and for any scholar that is always a welcome thing, one of the strengths of this study will most certainly be seen in the detailed and copious discussion of the theme of love. The footnotes will certainly provide a mine of information and extended discussion. While examining extensively two models of divine love, namely “transcendent-voluntarist” and “immanent-experientialist” and their principal proponents, Peckham does not dwell...

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