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Preaching and the Theological Imagination

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Edited By Zachary Guiliano and Cameron Partridge

In an era in which The Episcopal Church and the Church of England have become increasingly alarmed about numerical decline, Christian proclamation has become more important than ever. To fully meet this challenge, Anglicans must reclaim a vocation to preach the good news with both deep theological grounding and imaginative dynamism. Crucial to this process is a sustained engagement with deepening the theological imagination of the whole Christian community, through renewed practices of, and approaches to, preaching, study, and spiritual development.
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In an era in which The Episcopal Church and the Church of England have become increasingly alarmed about numerical decline, Christian proclamation has become more important than ever. To fully meet this challenge, Anglicans must reclaim a vocation to preach the good news with both deep theological grounding and imaginative dynamism. Crucial to this process is a sustained engagement with deepening the theological imagination of the whole Christian community, through renewed practices of, and approaches to, preaching, study, and spiritual development.

“It is a delight to see a younger generation of Anglican/Episcopalian priests and scholars engaging afresh here with the classic challenge of effective preaching. Drawing deeply on historic resources, but with a keen eye to the particular challenges of contemporary religious pluralism, these essays stimulate both the intellect and the imagination.”

Sarah Coakley, Norris-Hulse Professor of Divinity, University of Cambridge; Honorary Canon of Ely Cathedral

“Preaching, said Bishop Phillips Brooks, is the ‘communication of truth through personality,’ neither without the other. In many and various ways, these insightful essays take both sides of that definition seriously: on the one hand, theology, exegesis, doctrine—the word that is to be communicated; on the other, imagination, embodiment, rhetoric—the concrete particularity of communicating it. The results are remarkable for their diversity, their depth, and their bearing on both understanding and practicing the ministry of proclamation.”

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