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Preaching and the Theological Imagination

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Edited By Zachary Guiliano and Cameron Partridge

In an era in which The Episcopal Church and the Church of England have become increasingly alarmed about numerical decline, Christian proclamation has become more important than ever. To fully meet this challenge, Anglicans must reclaim a vocation to preach the good news with both deep theological grounding and imaginative dynamism. Crucial to this process is a sustained engagement with deepening the theological imagination of the whole Christian community, through renewed practices of, and approaches to, preaching, study, and spiritual development.
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In Hope of the Glory of God

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Margaret Guenther

Therefore, since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have obtained access to this grace in which we stand; and we boast in our hope of sharing the glory of God. And not only that, but also boast in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.

Romans 5:1–6

WE COULD use Paul among us now. I’m not sure that we would always like what he had to say to us—he can be quite tough and lacking in tact. And he would have our number; he would know our weaknesses and our doubts and our frailty. But in his way he would surely love us in our limitations, and he would understand the challenge and the often cold complexity of this time. And, maybe, despite all sorts of electronic gadgetry and life on a global scale, our time is not too different from his own complex, challenging era.

We find heavy, demanding stuff when we try to plumb the depths of these few verses in his letter to the Romans:

• A reminder of the unavoidable suffering that will be our lot if we are to follow Christ (thank you, no...

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