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How Stories Heal

Writing our Way to Meaning and Wholeness in the Academy

Series:

Robert J. Nash and Sydnee Viray

It is time for academics to embrace the fact that nothing is more appealing to readers – especially to our students – than personal stories with meaning-making implications that can touch all lives. No matter the age or stage in life, the personal or collective identity, everyone deals with meaning-making issues that challenge them – and others – throughout their lifetimes. And everyone we know finds that when encouraged to write their stories in the academy, they find meaning, wholeness, and healing.
How Stories Heal illustrates the value of personal narrative writing. Referring to this type of writing as the «turn to the subjective I» or to «me-search research», this is a book about Scholarly Personal Narrative (SPN) writing, actually written in an SPN style. This book will satisfy a huge need in higher education and scholarship, particularly for students who are writing undergraduate and graduate theses and doctoral dissertations; and also for junior and senior faculty who are looking to construct alternative forms of scholarship for publication.
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Part 3: The Transformative Power of Scholarly Personal Narrative Writing about Change from the Field

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Part 3

The Transformative Power of Scholarly Personal Narrative

Writing about Change from the Field

The three SPN authors in this section are highly respected professionals in their fields. Wind Paz-Amor is the Associate Director of the Living-Learning Complex on the University of Vermont Campus. Madelyn A. Nash is a recently retired elementary school guidance counselor who has worked in Vermont public schools for several decades. And Jennifer Prue is a University of Vermont professor who has been trained as a clinical psychologist, and who is currently a faculty member in the teacher-preparation program in the College of Education and Social Services. What all three SPN writers have in common is their steadfast belief in the proposition that change must start from within the person before change can happen outside the person—whether in the workspace, the playspace, the homespace, or the schoolspace. Each author tells a unique story of personal and professional transformation. Each author writes from the heart as well as from the head. Each has made a profound difference in their respective professions. ← 145 | 146 → ← 146 | 147 →

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