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Capitalism’s Educational Catastrophe

And the Advancing Endgame Revolt!


Ricardo D. Rosa and Joao J. Rosa

Neoliberal capitalism has paved the way to educational catastrophe. It has also opened paths for politically productive and transformative forms of localized resistance(s). This book examines the perilous catastrophe before us, and the possibility that we can reclaim our rights as citizens and redefine democracy as a process for global good rather than a euphemism for our collective enslavement to global markets, which annihilate our souls. The authors analyze the «crisis» in U.S. urban education through visceral narratives of social control while resisting the tendency to make the United States the epicenter of educational «reform» analysis. They explore neoliberal capitalism and processes of racialization as interdependent. The neoliberalization of education is having disproportionate negative implications for communities of color. More profoundly, neoliberal ideology is reworking processes of racialization and the way race is inscribed in discourse and bodies. The book is optimistic in sharing what might be done to inspire the mass withdrawal of consent not only to regressive regimes of high-stakes standardized testing, but to the entire edifice of neoliberal imperialism.
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4. Education by Corporate Priorities, Youth Minds and Bodies under Arrest, and the Complexities of Resistance and Resignation



Education by Corporate Priorities, Youth Minds and Bodies under Arrest, and the Complexities of Resistance and Resignation


In August 2013, Federal Judge Shira A. Scheindlin ruled, in a 195-page report, that the New York City Police Department resorted to a “policy of indirect racial profiling” as it increased the number of stops in minority communities. In reporting on the judge’s decision, New York Times noted:

But the stops were not the end of the problem, Judge Scheindlin found. After officers stopped people, they often conducted frisks for weapons, or searched the subjects’ pockets for contraband, like drugs, without any legal grounds for doing so. Also, she found that during police stops, blacks and Hispanics “were more likely to be subjected to the use of force than whites, despite the fact that whites are more likely to be found with weapons or contraband.” (Goldstein, 2013)

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