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American Indian Women of Proud Nations

Essays on History, Language, and Education

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Edited By Cherry Maynor Beasley, Mary Ann Jacobs and Ulrike Wiethaus

This multidisciplinary collection of nine previously unpublished essays presents new research in three interlocking domains: tribal history with a special emphasis on Native women in the Southeast, language revitalization efforts and the narrative knowledge inherent in indigenous oral culture, and traditional educational systems in the context of the ongoing colonization of American Indian educational practices and values. This volume highlights Southeastern Indian issues and demonstrates the unique situation of women in tribes lacking (full) federal recognition or a more inclusive and multidisciplinary discussion of Native women in more than one tribal nation. Southeastern themes are linked with topics of concern by other tribal nations to show commonalities and raised awareness about the central experiences and contributions of Native women in the encounter and ongoing struggle with Euro-American systems of oppression and cultural erasure.
This book spans the full gamut from naming women’s experiences of historical trauma to their ongoing efforts at preserving and rebuilding their Native nations. The collection of essays is distinctive in its Indigenous hermeneutics in that it insists on a holistic view of time and place-based knowledge – the past still fully affects the present and gives the present depth and meaning beyond the linear flow of time.
This book also features American Indian and non-American Indian scholars who are well known in American Indians studies, scholars beginning their career and scholars who, while not experts in American Indians studies, are considered experts in other disciplines and who recognize the unique attributes of Southeastern American Indian nations.
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Introduction

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ULRIKE WIETHAUS



This multi-disciplinary collection of eight previously unpublished essays by scholars well-established in their fields presents new research in three intersecting domains: tribal history with an emphasis on Native women in the Southeast, language revitalization efforts and the narrative knowledge inherent in indigenous oral culture, and traditional educational systems in the context of the on-going colonization of American Indian educational practices and values. Southeastern Indian issues are still all too often overlooked in current research, and the collection invites comparison of similarities and differences with other tribal nations. However, literature about Native women’s lives and issues is growing steadily, and the volume situates itself comfortably in the emerging canon of Native women’s distinct methodologies, values, and voices (Yarbrough 2014). Readers will note that the term feminism is speaking loudly through its absence. Indigenous women and women of color have articulated clearly in what ways feminist thinking and practice has been emic to European-American societies by problematizing patrilineal and patriarchal thought and practices characteristic of these societies. In contrast, the majority of American Indian and Indigenous societies encountered sexist systems through colonialism and as colonialism (Talamantez, Jaimes Guerrero, and Waters, 2003). Native women’s project since original contact with settler societies has been to safeguard Native nations and land, and as integral part of it, women’s traditional authority and leadership within matrilineal social systems, practices, values, and philosophies (Purdue 2001). Whereas European-American women conceive of gender justice as a future-oriented goal with hardly any tangible...

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