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Translation and Interpreting

Convergence, Contact and Interaction

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Edited By Eugenia Dal Fovo and Paola Gentile

A glance at the current state of the profession reveals a varied scenario in which Translation and Interpreting (T&I) constitute two interlingual processes usually performed by the same person in the same communicative situation or in different situations within the same set of relations and contacts. Although both practices call for somewhat different communicative competences, they are often seen as a single entity in the eyes of the public at large. T&I are thus found in relations of overlap, hybridity and contiguity and can be effected variously in professional practices and translation processes and strategies. Yet, when it comes to research, T&I have long been regarded as two separate fields of study. This book aims to address this gap by providing insights into theoretical and methodological approaches that can help integrate both fields into one and the same discipline. Each of the contributions in this volume offers innovative perspectives on T&I by focusing on topics that cover areas as diverse as training methods, identity perception, use of English as lingua franca, T&I strategies, T&I in specific speech communities, and the socio-professional status of translators and interpreters.
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7 Enriching Translator Training with Interpreting Tasks: Bringing Sight Translation into the Translation Classroom (Nataša Hirci / Tamara Mikolič Južnič / Agnes Pisanski Peterlin)

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NATAŠA HIRCI, TAMARA MIKOLIČ JUŽNIČ, AND AGNES PISANSKI PETERLIN

7 Enriching Translator Training with Interpreting Tasks: Bringing Sight Translation into the Translation Classroom

abstract

Translation and interpreting are separate although related activities performed under different constraints, such as time and resources availability. It is therefore not surprising that the pedagogies of translation and interpreting are distinct fields, each with their own theoretical and practical issues in line with the translator and interpreter competence development. Nevertheless, there are specific types of translation in which the two modalities are brought together, such as sight translation. This paper explores trainee translators’ performance and attitudes towards a sight translation and a written translation task. The results show that, while written translation yielded more successful solutions for lexical items, the output of the two modalities was of similar quality for pragmatic elements. Potential reasons for these differences, such as duration and the availability of resources, are examined. The findings also reveal that the participants’ attitudes towards the sight translation task were overwhelmingly positive. Our findings suggest that translator training can benefit from the synergies between the oral and written modalities.

1. Introduction

Translation and interpreting are two separate although related activities performed in different environments and under different constraints, yielding fairly different target texts. As a result, it is not surprising that the pedagogies of translation and interpreting are distinct – though related – fields,←213 | 214→ each with their own theoretical and practical issues...

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