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Reframing Realities through Translation

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Edited By Ali Almanna and Juan José Martínez Sierra

This volume affords an opportunity to reconsider international connections and conflicts from the specific standpoint of translation as a dynamic, sociocultural activity, carried out and influenced by numerous stakeholders. The various chapters contained in this volume survey a wide range of languages and cultures, and they all pivot around the relationships that can be established between translation and ideology, re-narration, identity, cultural representation and knowledge reproduction. The ultimate aim is to shed light on the actual act of translating in which the self is well-presented and beautified and the other is deformed and made ugly. In this volume, due consideration is given to the main frames (be they characterization, interpretive or identity frames) as well as to the nonverbal factors that play a fundamental role in forming the final shape of the translated product.
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9 Bible Translation and the Reconceptualization of the Universe: Negotiating the Christian and Traditional Igbo Conceptualizations of Life after Death (Uchenna Oyali)

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Uchenna Oyali

9 Bible Translation and the Reconceptualization of the Universe: Negotiating the Christian and Traditional Igbo Conceptualizations of Life after Death

Introduction

In the mid-nineteenth century ad, missionaries of the Church Missionary Society (CMS), a society of the Anglican Church, arrived in Igboland in Southern Nigeria for evangelism. In line with their policy to evangelize in the language of the natives (Ekechi 1972), the CMS missionaries started translating (portions of) the Bible into Igbo. This marked the beginning of Bible translation into Igbo. The earliest published Igbo Bible translations (IBTs) include Oku Omma nke Owu Matia: The Gospel according to St. Matthew (1860) and Ma Oru nke Apostoli: The Acts of the Apostles, the Epistles of Paul to the Corinthians, Galatians, and Ephesians (1866), which were published in the Isuama dialect of Igbo. The first translation of the complete New Testament (NT) was Agba Ofu nke Dinwenu-Ayi na Onye-Nzoputa-Ayi Jesu Kristi n’Asusu Ibo (1900), published in the Niger or Onitsha dialect. The next translation was Bible Nsọ: Union Version (1913), called Union because it was translated into an amalgam Igbo dialect, with features drawn from five Igbo dialects. Four other complete translations have been published after this, namely Baịbụlụ Nsọ (1988), published by the International Bible Society (IBS); Baịbụl Nsọ: Nhazi Katọlik (2000), by the Roman Catholic Church; Baibul Nsọ: Ndezigharị Ọhụrụ (2007), by the Bible League International; and Baịbụl Nsọ: Nsụgharị Ụwa Ọh...

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