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Developing Intra-regional Exchanges through the Abolition of Commercial and Tariff Barriers / L’abolition des barrières commerciales et tarifaires dans la région de l’Océan indien

Myth or Reality? / Mythe ou réalité ?

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Edited By Stéphanie Rohlfing-Dijoux

This book is related to the development of intraregional commercial exchanges in the region of the Indian Ocean. This issue is addressed from an economic as well as from a legal point of view. The contributions, in English and French, aim to present an overview of the economic, customs-related, technical, legal and cultural restraints that hinder the creation of a free trading area.

Cet ouvrage est consacré au développement des échanges commerciaux intrarégionaux dans la région de l’Océan Indien. Cette question est examinée sous un angle politique, économique et juridique. Les différentes contributions, en anglais et en français, visent à établir un état des lieux des freins économiques, douaniers, techniques, juridiques et culturels à la création d’un espace de libre échange.

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Investigating Alignment of Human Resource Management – Strategies to International Human Rights and Labour Standards. The case of the Top 100 Companies in Mauritius (Indeeren Vencatachellum and Roopanand Mahadew)

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Investigating Alignment of Human Resource Management Strategies to International Human Rights and Labour Standards

The case of the Top 100 Companies in Mauritius

Indeeren VENCATACHELLUM and Roopanand MAHADEW

The World Trade Organisation (WTO) recognised human rights violations as amounting to a trade barrier. In its General Council Decision (2003), members are prohibited from importing diamonds which are proceeds of human rights violations. Schefer (2005) argued that countries can legally impose restrictions on trade processes where human rights violations are evident. For Trudel and Cotte (2009) customers’ ethical expectations of organisations’ production process impacted their willingness to pay a premium and even punish companies viewed as unethical. This implies that organisations doing good through their human resource management (HRM) strategies, complying with human rights and labour standards, can reap more trade benefits. Hence, this paper aims at determining the extent of alignment between organisations’ HRM strategies and the human rights and labour standards. Secondary data from a study about HRM strategies adopted by Top 100 companies in Mauritius, was the basis for assessing their degree of alignment with international human rights and labour standards. Findings demonstrated a trend towards the adopted HRM strategies being aligned with international human rights and labour standards. Hence, organisations in Mauritius will be able to penetrate markets with high ethical expectations, and claim premium price for their products and services.

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