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Italian Yearbook of Human Rights 2017

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Edited By Centro di Ateneo per i Diritti Umani

The Italian Yearbook of Human Rights 2017 offers an up-to-date overview of the measures Italy has taken to adapt its legislation and policies to international human rights law and to comply with commitments voluntarily assumed by the Italian Government at the international level on the subject of fundamental rights. The 2017 Yearbook surveys the most significant activities of national and local Italian actors at domestic and international level, including civil society organisations and universities. It also dedicates space to recommendations made by international monitoring bodies within the framework of the United Nations, OSCE, the Council of Europe, and the European Union. Finally, the Yearbook provides a selection of international and national case-law that casts light on Italy's position vis-à-vis internationally recognised human rights.

"Italy and Human Rights in 2016: the "Long March" towards Establishing Independent National Human Rights Institutions and the Ambiguous Addition of the Crime of Torture to the Italian Criminal Code" is the title of the 2017 Yearbook introduction.

The Italian Agenda of Human Rights 2017 represents an updated orientation tool with regards the main initiatives to be undertaken on the legislative, infrastructural and policy-making fronts in order to strengthen the Italian system for promoting and protecting human rights.

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Italian Agenda of Human Rights 2017

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As for past years, for 2017 too, the research and editorial committee of the Italian Yearbook of Human Rights, based at the Human Rights Centre of the University of Padova, has compiled an Italian Agenda of Human Rights, drawing on the analysis of the recommendations made to Italy at the international level and the most critical issues identified in the successive editions of the Yearbook itself. The Agenda is put forward as an up-to-the-minute instrument for choosing the main initiatives to be undertaken on the legislative, infrastructural and policy-making fronts in order to strengthen the Italian system for promoting and protecting human rights (Agendas from previous years are available online at www.italianhumanrightsyearbook.eu).

Comparing it to last year’s edition of the Agenda, which had removed a total of ten items and sub-items (see 2016 Yearbook, p. 15–16), the Yearbook’s research and editorial committee found that Italy had made little significant progress. Only one point has been removed completely in the new Agenda, and the wording of four others has been altered in the light of the most recent developments.

The item removed was on children’s rights and legislation concerning the expulsion of children (point 28 of the 2016 Agenda): indeed, the provisions of l. 7 April 2017, No. 47 forbid the expulsion of unaccompanied foreign minors, whatever the circumstances, and also specify that in any case foreign minors may not be expelled if their expulsion exposes them to serious personal risk.

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