Show Less
Restricted access

Schooling and Education in Lebanon

Syrian and Syrian Palestinian Refugees Inside and Outside the Camps

Nina Maadad and Grant Rodwell

This book provides insights into the education and schooling of Syrian and Palestinian Syrian children inside and outside Lebanese refugee camps. It describes what is happening to these children and young refugees in terms of their schooling. Investigating the perspectives of children, their parents, teachers, community leaders, and state politicians and bureaucrats on the schooling provisions and educational opportunities for refugee children in Lebanon, this book reveals the condition of social disadvantage that Syrian and Syrian Palestinian refugee children and their families are experiencing in Lebanon. Maadad and Rodwell propose the idea of the pedagogy of the displaced that recognises socio-economic disadvantage and refocuses the nature of the learner and their learning and the philosophy of teaching. A collaborative action of society – the refugee families, the schools, the communities, the host state, the international aid agencies and the rest of the world – in addressing the barriers to education and schooling of the refugee children must break ground and be sustained.

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Introduction

Extract



The goal of this book is to provide insights into the education and schooling of children inside and outside Lebanese refugee camps. What is happening to children and young refugees in terms of their schooling? What experiences and challenges do these refugee children and young people have? This book aims to investigate the perspectives of children, their parents, teachers, community leaders, and state politicians and bureaucrats on the schooling provisions and educational opportunities for refugee children in Lebanon.

It must be emphasised that the refugees come from various socio- economic and cultural groups, mostly from Syria and the rest from Palestine and Iraq (UNHCR, 2013). These refugee camps are scattered all over Lebanon. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), in partnership with the relevant Lebanese Government ministries, runs these camps. A total of four camps – two Syrian and two Syrian Palestinian – are represented in the data and a total of eight schools are included. In total, the forty-eight respondents represent the sample clusters of children, parents, teachers, community leaders and state officials. It must be clarified that even though refugee camps in Lebanon also embraced Palestians and Iraqis who fled their conflict-riddled countries, this book is limited to refugees that fled Syria during the armed conflict of 2011, and these include Syrians and Palestinian refugees from Syria (PRS).

While in Lebanon, Nina visited the country’s Syrian and Palestinian- Syrian refugee camps and refugees in other communities in Lebanon, seeking responses from a...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.