Show Less
Restricted access

Ways of Seeing, Ways of Being

Representing the Voices of Tourism

Series:

Edited By Maurizio Gotti, Stefania Maci and Michele Sala

The aim of this volume is to give voice to the various and different perspectives in the investigation of tourism discourse in its written, spoken, and visual aspects. The chapters particularly focus on the interaction between the participants involved in the tourism practices, that is the promoters of tourist destinations, on the one hand, and tourists or prospective tourists on the other. In this dialogic interaction, tourism discourse, while representing and producing tourism as a global cultural industry, shows it to be on the move. Language movement in the tourism experience is here highlighted in the various methodological approaches and viewpoints offered by the investigations gathered in this volume.

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

The Discursive Construction of a ‘Dark Tourism’ Destination: The Touristification of Ground Zero and the Commodification of Tragedy on the 9/11 Memorial and Museum Website (Paola Catenaccio)

Extract

← 268 | 269 →

PAOLA CATENACCIO

The Discursive Construction of a ‘Dark Tourism’ Destination: The Touristification of Ground Zero and the Commodification of Tragedy on the 9/11 Memorial and Museum Website

1.   Introduction

The 9/11 Memorial and Museum were established respectively in 2011 and 2014 to commemorate the victims of the September 2001 attack which destroyed the Twin Towers, and to provide a lasting memory of the event, and its historical causes and consequences. They are located on the World Trade Center site, where the towers used to stand, and are one of New York’s most visited places. Since the opening of the memorial in 2011, over 23 million people have visited it, and the number of visitors to the museum (which opened in 2014) topped 4 million in 20151. While the memorial was designed, at least ideally, as a public space – i.e. something that should be part of the city’s ‘texture’ – it has often been suggested that it has so far failed to become truly integrated in the life of the city, having acquired, instead, a peculiar identity as something meant for tourists. As one distinguished commentator put it:

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.