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Multiple Perspectives on English Philology and History of Linguistics

A Festschrift for Shoichi Watanabe on his 80 th Birthday

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Edited By Tetsuji Oda and Hiroyuki Eto

This collection of articles covers a wide range of topics in English philology and history of linguistics. The volume proceeds from Old English studies offering a unique perspective and approach in literary and linguistic research into Anglo-Saxon England. Two articles deal with English phonology from both historical and contemporary standpoints, and another with a theoretical discussion of etymological inquiry. The last section contains three articles focusing on the history of linguistics or the history of ideas. The wide range of topics addressed in the 12 chapters of this volume reflects the diversity of interests in the research efforts of Shoichi Watanabe, professor emeritus at Sophia University, to whom this volume is dedicated by his former students. He is not only highly valued as a distinguished professor of English philology, but also acknowledged for his critique of civilization with his unique view of history and culture.

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KAZUYUKI SHIMOTANI ‘Taste is Taste’: Shifts in the Entailments of the Metaphorical Concept of Taste in Eighteenth-Century British Aesthetics 301

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KAZUYUKI SHIMOTANI ‘Taste is Taste’: Shifts in the Entailments of the Metaphorical Concept of Taste in Eighteenth-Century British Aesthetics Until the beginning of the eighteenth century, the metaphor TASTE1 had solely implied ‘liking or disliking,’ viz., ‘personal preference’ in aesthetic as well as in gustatory experience. This metaphor, however, began to be applied to ‘the aesthetic faculty’ the faculty to perceive and appreciate beauty in the essays on TASTE that flooded Britain during the century,2 when the term aesthetic did not yet exist in the English vocabulary.3 Philosophers, literary critics, and almost every- one in the polite world during that time discussed TASTE.4 The as- cendancy of TASTE in aesthetics and literary criticism in eighteenth- century Britain was a remarkable phenomenon in the history of ideas. However, the abundance of theories on TASTE did not lead to the establishment of a uniform and clear concept of TASTE; it only served to make the concept more diverse and ambiguous. I have already discussed the causes of the ambiguity and con- fusion peculiar to eighteenth-century British authors’ concepts of TASTE in my book, The Limits of the Metaphorical Concept of Taste in Eighteenth-Century British Aesthetics and Criticism, 5 which 1 In this chapter, TASTE (in uppercase letters) will be used to indicate metaphorical taste, i.e., mental taste. 2 Dickie dubs this century “the century of taste, that is, of the theory of taste” (1996: 3). 3 According to the OED, the word aesthetic, as applied to ‘criticism of taste,’...

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